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Sunday, July 26
 

9:00am

IPOS Board of Directors Meeting - By Invitation Only
IPOS Board of Directors Meeting

Sunday July 26, 2015 9:00am - 5:30pm
Magnolia Mezzanine Level
 
Monday, July 27
 

8:30am

IPOS Board of Directors Meeting - By Invitation Only
IPOS Board of Directors Meeting

Monday July 27, 2015 8:30am - 6:00pm
Magnolia Mezzanine Level
 
Tuesday, July 28
 

8:00am

2: Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Cancer Patients (One-Day Workshop)
Meaning Centered Psychotherapy for Cancer Patients

Speakers: Allison Applebaum MD, William Breitbart MD


This one day experiential workshop provides an overview of a novel counseling intervention for patients with advanced cancer, entitled “Meaning Centered Psychotherapy”. Participants will be introduced to the topics of meaning and spirituality as they relate to cancer care and the experience of patients with cancer. The basic concepts of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy will then be described. Meaning Centered Psychotherapy is based on the concepts of meaning as derived from the work of Viktor Frankl, M.D. and adapted for use in cancer populations by our team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Two forms of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy have been developed: Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (8 weekly 1 ½ hour sessions; Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy (7 weekly 1 hour sessions). Both interventions are manualized and randomized controlled trials are currently being conducted. Preliminary data from these studies will be presented as well. During the workshop participants will have the opportunity to participate in experiential exercises utilized in Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. In addition, a detailed description of the intervention and the content of each session will be provided. Newer adaptations of Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for breast cancer survivors, Caregivers, bereavement, and cultural adaptation for Chines and Spanish speaking populations will be discussed.

  1. The attendees will become familiar with the concept of spirituality as a construct composed of faith and/or meaning.
  2. The attendees will become familiar with the importance of meaning, as a component of spiritual well-being, and its relationship to depression, hopelessness and desire for death
  3. The attendees will become familiar with a structured, didactic and experiential 8 session intervention for advanced cancer patients aimed at sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning in the face of terminal illness.
  4. The attendees will participate in experiential exercises that are components of 4 of the sessions in Meaning Centered Psychotherapy.


Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Chinatown Meeting Level 3

8:00am

1: Psychosocial Intervention Research (Two-Day Workshop)
Psychosocial Intervention Research: Principles for Rigorous Design and Tips for Successful Conduct

Speakers: Susanne Dalton, Karla Gough, Penelope Schofield

During this 2 day workshop, presenters will give short methodological impulse lectures on 
  • principles of study designs, bias and confounding in this particular area of research,
  • choice of appropriate psychometric assessment measures,
  • how to standardise and manualise a psychosocial intervention,
  • planning of studies for complex psychosocial interventions including design options like cluster-randomisation and step-wedge,
  • determining sample size, the interplay with between expected/actual recruitment rates and budget (usually the three elements that make an RCT a success or failure) and approaches to analyses and how to deal with missing data.

Additionally we will discuss the interaction of research and clinical work and possibilities of the application of research findings into clinical routine work.

The main part of the workshop is dedicated to the discussion of the research projects or ideas of the workshop participants. Each participant will be encouraged to give a short presentation (3-5 slides) on an own planned or on-going study. 

Presentations will be conducted with humour and in an interactive fashion drawing on the presenters’ substantial research experience. All facilitators have extensive publication records in psychosocial cancer research and have learned about pitfalls in research from their own experience. Presentations will include case studies/real world examples and how-to-do suggestions

Please note that the workshop focuses solely on quantitative research methods.



Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Shaw Meeting Level 3

8:00am

5: Influence of Culture on Cancer Care: Asian Perspectives **CANCELLED**

***This workshop has been cancelled***

Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:01pm
WORKSHOP CANCELLED

8:00am

4: Psychoneuroimmunology Across the Life Span (One-Day Workshop)
Psychoneuroimmunology Across the Life Span

Speakers: Elisabeth Andritsch and Miri Cohen


Health psychology is based on the „bio-psycho-social model“, that includes effects of psychological and social factors on disease risk, prevention, treatment compliance, quality of life and many other essential aspects connected with wellbeing and self-efficacy. Psychoneuroimmunology provides an understanding of fundamental mechanism involved in the bio-psycho-social model meaning that psychological and social factors influence disease processes via two main mechanisms: psychosocial processes (individual differences like optimism, depression or resources concerning coping and social support…) and health behaviors (sleep, alcohol, sports, relaxation exercises…). In the last decades the knowledge about the complexity of the relationship between psychosocial distress and immune regulation in the context of the cancer disease has increased and therefore the integration of the psycho-neuro-immunological concept in psychological interventions for patients with cancer has great potential.

This workshop will be split into two parts: the first part of this workshop will provide an overview (basics) of the concept of psychoneuroimmunology and the mind-body connection. 

The second part will go deeper into the main elements of methods relating to the PNI concepts integrated in psychosocial interventions for cancer patients and in research questions.

The workshop is open to clinicians from all professions caring for cancer patients and young researchers, who are interested or working in the field of Psychoneuroimmunology and who consider researching in this area.

In the first part of the workshop (morning session):

  • The attendee will get acquainted with the basic knowledge of PNI and will understand the bi-directional connections between emotions and body and the processes that mediate these connections.
  • The attendee shall be able to understand principles of PNI research.
In the second part of the workshop (afternoon session):
  • The attendee shall be able to understand the specific aspects of Psychoneuroimmunology in Cancer
  • The attendee shall be able to practice research projects
  • The attendee shall be able to connect his or her own experiences with the PNI knowledge
  • The attendee shall be able to identify the effects of specific interventions on the immune system and physical health


Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:01pm
LeDroit Park Meeting Level 3

8:00am

6: Managing Cancer and Living Meaningfully (CALM) (One-Day Workshop)
Managing Cancer and Living Meaningfully (CALM): An Individual and Couple Based Supportive-Expressive Intervention

Speakers: Gary Rodin MD and Sarah Hales MD

This interactive workshop provides a theoretical and clinical framework for the CALM intervention and will build skills in in its delivery. Through the use of videotaped treatment sessions, participants will learn how to integrate the four content domains of CALM with the process of this intervention. They will consider how to engage sensitively with individuals and their partners at this stage of life, and to help them face the threats of physical decline, dependency and mortality. The workshop will help participants to make creative use of their own experience within the structure of CALM and to engage with the practical and profound problems that individuals face at this stage of their life. It will help participants to build and apply therapeutic skills in empathic engagement, mentalization and in intersubjective relatedness in the therapeutic setting. Finally, it will address the clinical structure in which CALM can be delivered, the ongoing supervisory process that supports it and the evaluation of treatment outcomes. The attendee will be able to:

  1. Understand and apply the theoretical framework of the CALM intervention
  2. More effectively engage with patients and their primary caregivers living with metastatic and advanced cancer.
  3. Integrate the four domains of CALM with the treatment process
  4. Create a clinical structure for CALM and evaluate CALM treatment outcomes

Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:00am - 5:01pm
Mount Vernon Square Meeting Level 3

8:01am

3: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Cancer Patients (Half-Day Workshop, AM)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Cancer Patients and Survivors

Speaker: Dianne M. Shumay

Diagnosis with cancer brings significant challenges for survivors attempting to live full and meaningful lives in the face of fear, illness and pain. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” behavior therapy, with its focus on mindfulness, flexible perspective taking, values and committed action seems particularly well-suited to helping cancer patients live their best possible lives. ACT has strong empirical support for addressing anxiety and other psychological and physical symptoms in healthy and medically ill populations, with new but growing evidence for effectiveness in cancer.This 4 hour highly interactive workshop will give a context for the clinical application of ACT for cancer patients and survivors, teach basic clinically-applicable skills in ACT, provide an overview of research evidence for ACT and describe a model manualized intervention and research plan for addressing anxiety in cancer survivors. Skill-building and role-play in small groups will be focused on analysis and intervention in mindful awareness, perspective- taking, acceptance, and making choices based on personal values, with experiential exercises and training in practical application to psycho-oncology settings. We will describe and demonstrate ACT-consistent ways to conceptualize psychological and physical symptoms and health-related behaviours for cancer patients and survivors. For those interested in research, we will share an overview of the evidence base and our own experience with launching a research program in ACT in cancer and facilitate an interactive discussion of concepts and research strategies.The attendee shall be able to:

  • Conceptualize psychological symptoms in terms of an ACT framework including experiential avoidance, fusion and perspective-taking.
  • Formulate an ACT-based intervention plan targeting mindful awareness, defusion, and clarification of personal values.
  • Describe the research evidence for ACT in cancer and a model for researching interventions for ACT in cancer.

Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:01am - 12:00pm
Union Station Meeting Level 3

8:01am

7: Treating Body Image Concerns of Cancer Patients (Half-Day Workshop, AM)
Treating Body Image Concerns of Cancer Patients: Latest Advancements in Science and Clinical Practice

Speakers: Erin Buck PhD, Irene Teo PhD and Michelle Fingeret PhD

This 4 hour workshop will be delivered by psychologists working in the United States and Singapore who have unique expertise in conducting research and clinical care for cancer patients adjusting to body image changes that result from cancer and its treatment. We seek to provide a general overview of theoretical and conceptual foundations for managing body image changes experienced by cancer survivors and introduce attendees to several internationally recognized programs that have fueled major advancements in research, clinical practice, and public policy related to body image care for cancer patients. The majority of the workshop will be focused on training psychosocial providers how to develop and deliver empirically-supported body image interventions to enhance patient care. A broad range of treatment strategies will be covered including the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness, motivational, and acceptance-based approaches. We will also demonstrate ways that body image interventions developed with cancer patients at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States have been applied and modified for use with cancer patients at the National Cancer Centre in Singapore. This will provide a unique opportunity to consider cross-cultural issues in body image care.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe 3 theoretical models providing a foundation for empirically-supported intervention strategies to treat body image difficulties of cancer survivors
  2. Delineate numerous practical intervention strategies to help cancer patients cope with recent body image changes and promote greater body image acceptance during survivorship
  3. Identify cultural issues affecting the delivery of body image care to cancer survivors in different parts of the world


Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:01am - 12:00pm
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

8:01am

8: eHealth Development and Implementation of Internet interventions in Psycho-Oncology (Half-Day Workshop, AM)
eHealth Development and Implementation of Internet Interventions in Psycho-Oncology

Speakers: Lee Ritterband, PhD

The Internet is now a vital resource to hundreds of millions of people around the world, and its uses seem limitless. However, nowhere does it seem more useful than in the health care field. One area, in particular, where the integration and utilization of the Internet has skyrocketed is as a tool to deliver behavioral and psycho-social based interventions. These Internet interventions are usually derived from effective face-to-face treatments that have been operationalized and transformed for Internet delivery. They are often highly structured, but personalized and tailored to the individual user. They can be deployed as self or semi-self-guided programs, and most are interactive and enhanced with the multimedia capabilities of the Web.

Making behavioral/psychosocial/mental health treatment and prevention programs widely available on the Internet has obvious appeal. Delivering care in this way can help overcome many of the traditional barriers to providing care, including inadequate treatment access, limited trained clinicians, poor geographical distribution of knowledgeable professionals, and expense. They clearly have promise as an efficacious, scalable, and cost effective prevention and treatment option with significant public health impact. Furthermore, interventions can be delivered in a standardized manner with fidelity across a variety of settings. Outcome trials of Internet interventions have consistently demonstrated significant changes in behavior and meaningful symptom improvements.

This workshop will begin with a brief history (and end with a discussion of the considerable future) of Internet interventions. Similarities of Internet interventions will be presented, while also highlighting the substantial variations among programs, and differences between them and more typical websites. Information regarding the use of theory and behavior change models to guide Internet intervention development will be reviewed. Several cancer focused Internet interventions will be shown in more detail as examples. Program features will be demonstrated and outcomes from clinical trials will be highlighted. Finally, attendees will have an opportunity to work as part of a small group on creating elements of an Internet intervention. This hands-on experience will utilize a developed flexible platform for developing and implementing these type of programs.The attendee shall be able to:
  1. Define and identify Internet interventions, particularly as they compare with other types of websites.
  2. Appreciate the underlying theoretical foundations of Internet interventions and how eHealth programs can lead to behavior change and symptom improvements.
  3. Leave with some hands-on experience in utilizing a flexible framework for developing an Internet intervention.
  4. Understand the current potential of eHealth interventions and some possible future directions of the field.
Workshop attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptop to this session, as there will be some hands on opportunities.

Tuesday July 28, 2015 8:01am - 12:00pm
DuPont Circle Meeting Level 3

10:00am

12:00pm

Lunch - Psychosocial Academy Workshop Attendees Only
Tuesday July 28, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Independence Salon A-C Meeting Level 4

1:00pm

9: Mindfulness-based Interventions in Cancer Care (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Mindfulness-based Interventions

Speaker: Linda Carlson, PhD

This workshop will introduce clinicians and researchers to the topic of mindfulness and mindfulness-based interventions such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR). Background on the origins and definitions of mindfulness meditation will be reviewed. The MBCR program curriculum will be outlined and various components directly be experienced by participants. The research on mindfulness as applied in oncology settings will also be briefly reviewed. The workshop will be structured to intersperse didactic sections with experiential activities and group discussion.

  1. The attendees will be able to define the concept of mindfulness and discuss its origins.
  2. Attendees will learn the difference between several mindfulness-based interventions, and be introduced to the specific curriculum for Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery.
  3. Attendees will personally experience introductory mindfulness meditation and yoga techniques.
  4. The attendees will become familiar with the research on mindfulness-based interventions in oncology.

Tuesday July 28, 2015 1:00pm - 4:59pm
Union Station Meeting Level 3

1:00pm

10: Helping Parents with Advanced Cancer to Talk with their Children (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Helping Parents with Advanced Cancer to Talk with their Children

Speakers: Jane Turner MD and Paula Rauch MD

The emotional impact of advanced cancer is considerable. However for parents of dependent children the grief is compounded by uncertainty about what to say to their children and lack of information about what they can do to help their children to cope. The desire of parents to protect their children from distress can lead to avoidance which compounds children’s anxiety. Young children typically express this anxiety behaviourally which in turn increases parental distress. Caring for parents with advanced cancer who have dependent children is described as particularly stressful for oncologists who may lack knowledge about ways of assisting parents. 

This workshop provides practical information about the impact of parental advanced cancer for children in different age groups, and presents evidence about children’s response to parental death. There will be discussion and practical demonstrations of ways of engaging parents to feel more confident about responding to their children, drawing on the evidence about factors associated with resilience in children facing adversity. Participants will be invited to engage in discussion about clinical challenges they have faced and explore strategies for responding. There will be discussion about ways of engaging with other members of the multidisciplinary team to increase their knowledge, skills and confidence in responding to the concerns of parents with advanced cancer about their children.

Handouts, supporting resources and relevant papers will be provided to workshop attendees.

  1. The attendee will be able to describe the emotional impact of parental cancer for children of different developmental stages
  2. The attendee will be able to describe the responses of children to parental death
  3. The attendee will be able to describe factors demonstrated to be associated with resilience in children facing adversity
  4. The attendee will demonstrate skills in discussing ways parents with advanced cancer can help their children to cope
  5. The attendee will demonstrate knowledge about ways of assisting colleagues to support parents with advanced cancer

Tuesday July 28, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
DuPont Circle Meeting Level 3

1:00pm

11: Assessing and Treating Cancer-Related Sexual Changes (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Assessing and Treating Cancer-Related Sexual Changes

Speakers: Mary K. Hughes MS RN CNS and Christian J. Nelson PhD

Psychosocial oncologists assist patients with quality of life issues, but often fail to address sexuality changes as a result of cancer or its treatment. Sexual dysfunction is one of the more common and enduring aftereffects of cancer treatment. Sexual problems are observed in at least 50% of survivors of breast cancer and gynecological cancer, as well as up to 90% of men treated for prostate cancer. Impairment in sexual functioning depends on the type of treatment, the type of cancer, their gender, and their age. Typically at least 20% of men and women report new sexual problems after cancer treatment.

For both genders, typical dysfunctions include decreased or absent sexual desire and difficulty feeling arousal and pleasure. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the other frequent complaint for men, and sexual changes related to sudden menopause—reduced vaginal elasticity and lubrication, and subsequent pain during sexual activity are common for women. Difficulty achieving orgasm is less common for men or women, and is often secondary to having sex with little erotic desire or arousal. 

Women have fewer medical treatment options because of the type of cancer they had. Some women benefit from tailored hormone replacement, vaginal muscle training and/or use of vaginal dilators, topical creams, or reconstructive surgery. Other treatment options such as erotic devices, behavioral techniques, or erotica may be helpful in addressing sexual dysfunction. Sometimes couples counseling can be helpful to improve the sexual relationship. 

This workshop will focus on the beginner or intermediate clinician and ways to help with assessing and treating cancer-related sexual dysfunction. The clinicians will learn about the medical, psychological, and social causes of sexual dysfunction as well as medical and behavioral treatments available. How to conduct a psychosocial assessment of sexual function in a cancer setting will be discussed as well as techniques of basic sexual counseling. Resources for appropriate referrals will be discussed.

At the end of the 4-hour workshop, the attendee will be able to:
  1. Describe the components of sexuality.
  2. List 3 possible causes of sexual dysfunction in the patient treated for cancer.
  3. Describe 3 possible treatments for erectile dysfunction, vaginal dryness, or low libido.

Tuesday July 28, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

3:00pm

5:00pm

APOS President's Reception - By Invitation Only
Tuesday July 28, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Silver Linden Mezzanine Level

6:00pm

 
Wednesday, July 29
 

8:00am

12: When the Invisible Screen Becomes Visible **CANCELLED**
***This workshop has been cancelled***

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 11:59am
WORKSHOP CANCELLED

8:00am

16: Cancer Control and Predictive Genetic Testing Among Youth (Half-Day Workshop, AM)
Cancer Control and Predictive Genetic Testing Among Youth:The Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELSI), and Health Promotive Opportunities

Speakers: Angela Bradbury MD, Dava Szalda MD, Linda Patrick-Miller PhD and Lisa A. Schwartz PhD

With advances in cancer predisposition genetics and cancer treatment, and better understanding of familial and genetic risk, the number of youth with identified risk for future cancer is increasing. It is known that familial patterns of cancer and/or genetic susceptibility confer risk to offspring. In addition, cancer survivors are at higher risk of secondary malignant neoplasms as a result of the carcinogenic treatment to cure their first cancer, or an underlying genetic predisposition. At the same time, there is increasing evidence that adolescence is a key period of carcinogenic vulnerability that health behaviors might alter. Furthermore guidelines suggest screening should be tailored to individual risk. As such, there is a need for health care professionals to understand the current state of the science and policy with regards to cancer control and genetic testing in order to help families and youth understand and navigate their cancer risk.

The workshop will use breast cancer risk as our primary example. Young women with genetic predisposition, known family history of breast cancer, and history of previous malignancy are at higher risk for developing breast cancer in adulthood. Long-term surveillance is less than optimal for young adults at high risk, which is likely attributable to many psychosocial and systems factors. Although current U.S. guidelines recommend delaying testing for adult onset cancers, e.g. BRCA1/2 mutations, until adulthood, there has been ongoing debate over the associated ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) in BRCA1/2 families. There are many challenges and questions related to how best to communicate, manage and counsel these patients and families during the transition to adulthood prior to the onset of regular surveillance with breast imaging. Furthermore, there is growing evidence of risk and protective factors, many of which are controllable, related to future breast cancer risk that can be addressed in adolescence. Thus, breast cancer is an exemplar cancer with which to highlight the nuances and challenges of facilitating and providing appropriate risk-based care and surveillance.

Using breast cancer as our primary example, we will provide an overview of the current state of the science related to cancer susceptibility, including genetic testing, with particular emphasis on implications for youth. Topics of discussion will include: 1) US guidelines and policy and how they might differ from other international standards and practices, 2) ethical, legal and social (ELSI) Issues, 3) counseling on health promotion, genetic testing, and surveillance; 4) appropriate referrals for multidisciplinary care 5) communication with parents, patients, and adult providers, 6) and related issues when transferring adolescent and young adult patients to adult care. The workshop will combine didactics, review of cases, and small and large group discussion. The workshop leaders represent clinical and research expertise in pediatric and medical oncology, adolescent medicine, pediatric and adult clinical health psychology, medical ethics, and cancer control and health promotion.

  • Describe current state of the science related to cancer susceptibility and control among youth using breast cancer as an example.
  • Describe the ethical legal and social issues (ELSI) related to genetic testing in minors.
  • Describe current US guidelines and practices related to genetic testing and breast cancer prevention among adolescents and young adults and potential for international differences.
  • Describe approaches to anticipatory guidance and counseling about cancer risk and cancer control for adolescents and young adults.

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Capitol Hill Meeting Level 3

8:00am

17: Why Do I Need To Know About Psychiatric Medications? (Half-Day Workshop, AM)
Why Do I Need to Know About Psychiatric Medications? I'm Not a Prescriber!
- Because You Have the Opportunity to Save Your Patient's Life

Speakers: Andrew Roth, MD, Philip Bailer, MD and Steven Passik, PhD

Clinicians have numerous tools at their disposal to help adult cancer patients dealing with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other cancer sequelae. Psychiatric medications are most frequently prescribed to cancer patients by oncologists and general practitioners, however psychiatric syndromes are often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Few oncology practices have dedicated psychiatric consultants familiar with the nuances of Psycho-Oncology. Even when patients receive psychotropic medications appropriately, they may have problems that arise before their next Oncology visit or before they see the person who prescribed their psychiatric medications. Psychologists, nurses and social workers play an essential role in identifying psychological and physical symptoms as well as both beneficial and problematic medication effects as they provide frontline psychosocial interventions and support for cancer patients.

This workshop is designed for the non-prescribing psycho-oncology clinician as well as the psychiatrist who is new to the world of Psycho-pharmaco-oncology. The workshop will focus on key target symptoms amenable to psychopharmacological intervention, including anxiety, depression, insomnia, pain, fatigue and anorexia. Precipitants will learn to identify psychological reactions to medical conditions or treatments; psychiatric presentations of medical conditions or treatments; medical presentations of psychiatric conditions and common medical complications of psychiatric conditions or treatments. 

Basic information will be presented about medications used to alleviate QOL symptoms that arise in the cancer setting from diagnosis to survivorship or end of life care, and the interface of psychotherapy and medication management. 

We will review why certain medications are used and why some are avoided, looking at potential benefits, unwanted side effects, and drug-drug interactions, since you may be the first person to identify a serious adverse event. The workshop will also enhance your ability to provide psychoeducation to patients regarding psychiatric medications.

The following classes of medications will be covered in this workshop: antidepressants, anxiolytics/hypnotics, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and psychostimulants. Case vignettes will be used to illustrate how to formulate an appropriate and effective medication regimen in a cancer patient struggling with a complex cancer-related symptom burden. Plenty of time will be allowed for questions and discussion, and handouts will be provided for the audience.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Psychotropic non-prescribers and junior psychiatrists will learn how to hone essential clinical and observation skills to improve the quality of life, mental health and safety of their patients by understanding the basics of the psychophysiology of cancer. Participants will learn about new technologies, such as Urine Drug Testing (UDT) and Pharmaco-Genetic Testing (PGT), which will help them be even more a part of multidisciplinary oncology teams.
  2. Participants will learn basic psycho-pharmaco-oncology including how to think about better and worse choices of psychotropics, as well as how to identify problematic side effects to transmit to the oncology team before the patient’s next visit with the oncology team.

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
DuPont Circle Meeting Level 3

8:00am

APOS Board of Directors Meeting - By Invitation Only
APOS Board of Directors Meeting

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Magnolia Mezzanine Level

8:00am

13: Models of Family-Centered Care During Cancer Care & Bereavement (Full-Day Workshop)
Models of Family-Centered Care During Cancer Care & Bereavement

Speaker: David Kissane MD, Peter Steinglass MD, Marta Porebiak PhD, Talia Zaider PhD and Wendy Lichtenthal PhD

An experiential workshop utilizing exemplary videos and role-plays to train clinicians in the conduct of family-centered interventions across the trajectory of cancer care:

  1. Family-Focused Grief Therapy, a model of family care that targets those of risk of complicated grief by delivering continuity of family support through the phase of advanced cancer into bereavement; 
  2. Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy for parents who have lost a child to cancer to support parents in finding meaning in their loss, in their child’s life, and in their own life; 
  3. The Ackerman Multiple Family Discussion Groups, a psycho-educational family therapy model designed for families dealing with chronic illnesses, including cancer; and
  4.  Responding to challenges in discussing death and dying, optimizing open family communication, containing conflict and maintaining safe therapy, drawing relevant family members into sessions and sustaining a focus on the meaning and value of life. 

Strategies in framing circular questions, providing integrative summaries to deepen family members’ understanding, and the promotion of empathic exchanges between family members to optimize their mutual support and cohesion illustrate key therapist skills.

  1. To acquire skills in family assessment during palliative care that transfer into sustained work in bereavement; 
  2. To incorporate meaning-centered dimensions into working with parents bereaved of a child to cancer; 
  3. To respond to conflictual families promoting safety through circularity; 
  4. To understand how to use a model of Multiple Family Discussion Groups in cancer care;
  5. To practice the conduct of family meetings through role-play. 

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
LeDroit Park Meeting Level 3

8:00am

14: Communication and Challenging Discussions at the End of Life (Full-Day Workshop)
Communication and Challenging Discussions at the End of Life

Speakers: Darius Razavi MD PhD

This one day experiential workshop provides an overview of common clinical challenges in end-of-life care and an introduction to the issue of improving health care professionals communication skills in this area of clinical practice. Useful basic communication skills will be briefly recalled. Participants will be introduced to the main components of advanced communication skills, which may be used in the highly emotional contexts of end of life care and in addressing common difficult clinical encounters. Teaching methods designed to improve communication skills will then be described: techniques (learner-centered, skills-focused, practice-oriented) will be discussed. The usefulness of role-play and immediate feed-back will be emphasized. Effective manualized training programs that have been tested in randomized controlled studies conducted in Brussels for physicians and nurses will be presented. During the workshop participants will have the opportunity to test the type of role-playing exercises utilized in these studies. In addition, a detailed description of these studies and the content of training sessions tested will be provided.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. The attendees will become familiar with end of life discussion and communication.
  2. The attendees will become familiar with the importance of communication skills, as a component of end of life care, and its relationship to patients and family satisfaction, concerns and distress.
  3. The attendees will become familiar with the communication skills, which may improve health care professionals end of life care and the management of difficult end of life decisions;
  4. Attendees will become familiar with strategies to address frequently challenging clinical communication (eg conflict regarding treatment goals with family or within clinical team; responding to requests to hasten death; assessing and responding to existential concerns and other forms of distress)
  5. Attendees will become familiar with the potential impact on clinicians themselves in caring for a dying patient and the consequences for patients, including strategies to minimize this impact.
  6. The attendees will participate in role-playing exercises with direct feed-backs and in case discussions.

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

8:00am

15: Fear of Recurrence: A Novel Framework and Therapy Model (Full-Day Workshop)
Fear of Recurrence: A Novel Framework and Therapy Model

Speakers: Prof Phyllis Butow, Prof Louise Sharpe and Prof Jane Turner

This workshop will focus on the most common and severe cancer survivorship issue – fear of cancer recurrence (FCR). FCR is seen in all people who survive cancer, but many find that it diminishes over time. However, for a substantial number of people (up to 60%), FCR continues to be high and disabling, preventing them from making future plans, causing over-screening and over-use of medical services and compromising quality of life. This workshop will provide a review of frameworks for understanding FCR, and will present a novel framework combining elements of the Self-Regulatory Executive Function (S-REF) model, Relational Frame Theory and Self Regulation Theory. A therapy based on this model, including elements of metacognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy and psycho-education, will be outlined. Practical strategies to implement this therapy will be demonstrated and practiced in the workshop. Patient handouts, relevant papers and a framework will be provided to workshop attendees. Workshop Objectives:

  1. The attendee shall be able to describe several theoretical frameworks for fear of cancer recurrence
  2. The attendee shall be able to describe and deliver methods to reduce attentional focus on cancer, including attention training
  3. The attendee shall be able to describe and deliver methods to teach mindfulness training in the context of fear of cancer recurrence
  4. The attendee shall be able to describe and deliver methods to provide education and encourage appropriate levels of screening and monitoring for cancer recurrence

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Mount Vernon Square Meeting Level 3

8:00am

1: Psychosocial Intervention Research (Two-Day Workshop, Continued)
Psychosocial Intervention Research: Principles for Rigorous Design and Tips for Successful Conduct

Speakers: Susanne Dalton, Kara Gough, Penelope Schofield

During this 2 day workshop, presenters will give short methodological impulse lectures on 

  • principles of study designs, bias and confounding in this particular area of research,
  • choice of appropriate psychometric assessment measures,
  • how to standardise and manualise a psychosocial intervention,
  • planning of studies for complex psychosocial interventions including design options like cluster-randomisation and step-wedge,
  • determining sample size, the interplay with between expected/actual recruitment rates and budget (usually the three elements that make an RCT a success or failure) and approaches to analyses and how to deal with missing data.

Additionally we will discuss the interaction of research and clinical work and possibilities of the application of research findings into clinical routine work.

The main part of the workshop is dedicated to the discussion of the research projects or ideas of the workshop participants. Each participant will be encouraged to give a short presentation (3-5 slides) on an own planned or on-going study. 

Presentations will be conducted with humour and in an interactive fashion drawing on the presenters’ substantial research experience. All facilitators have extensive publication records in psychosocial cancer research and have learned about pitfalls in research from their own experience. Presentations will include case studies/real world examples and how-to-do suggestions

Please note that the workshop focuses solely on quantitative research methods.


Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Shaw Meeting Level 3

8:00am

8:00am

8:00am

Exhibit Move-In
Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00am - 6:00pm
Marquis Ballroom Meeting Level 2

10:00am

12:00pm

Lunch - Psychosocial Academy Workshop Attendees Only
Wednesday July 29, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Liberty Salon I-L Meeting Level 4

12:00pm

1:00pm

Tour of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, DC - Separate Registration Required
Limited Capacity seats available

Visit one the treasures of the US national capital while you are here for the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology by joining us for a guided tour of the Washington National Cathedral.

We've arranged for a small, intimate gathering to view gargoyles, cool off in catacombs, and search for outer space clues in stained glass. Door-to-door round trip bus service provided from the hotel lobby. Have a little fun before you dive in to all the excitement and intensity of our annual meeting!

Price: $25.00 USD (Includes transportation)

Wednesday July 29, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington National Cathedral 3101 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington DC 20016

1:00pm

18: Psychosocial Distress: Building a Research Agenda to Understand and Improve Clinical Outcomes (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Psychosocial Distress: Building a Research Agenda to Understand and Improve Clinical Outcomes 


Speakers: Lynne Padgett, PhD


Many unanswered questions challenge both research and care delivery in oncology related psychosocial distress. What are the most efficient assessments of distress? How does distress screening lead to improved clinical outcomes? What are current and future data harmonization efforts for measuring distress? What unique research opportunities exist due to the implementation of Commission on Cancer standards? How might these efforts improve clinical outcomes? Do successful models of assessment and care delivery translate across disease and symptom burden? 

This half-day collaborative workshop provides participants the opportunity to actively engage in the development of research priorities for measuring and implementing psychosocial distress screening. Experts from diverse fields including measurement and assessment, health informatics, integrative data analysis, health services research, primary care, and basic social sciences will provide brief presentations on how their field can inform efforts to advance the effectiveness of distress screening. These brief presentations will be interspersed with facilitated group discussions to highlight research opportunities and intersections to improve clinical outcomes. The goal of the workshop is for participants and presenters to contribute to the development of a blueprint for the next generation of research priorities and opportunities to build on.

Researchers, clinicians and evaluators of all disciplines who are interested in contributing to a designed to outline a comprehensive research agenda in the field of oncology-related psychosocial distress in the context of oncology and palliative care. Contributions from the fields of clinical research, health services research, dissemination and implementation, quality improvement, informatics, communication/decision-making, and research design (e.g., measurement and analysis) are encouraged to attend and contribute. The workshop is suitable for students and professionals at all career stages.

Learning Objectives

  1. The attendee shall be able to describe current research gaps in the field of psychosocial distress assessment and clinical application.
  2. The attendees will participate in cross-disciplinary discussions aimed at identifying research priorities in psychosocial distress.
  3. The attendee shall be able to identify at least 2 other fields that intersect with their research interests.
  4. The attendee shall be able to define the next steps to address research gaps and know how to participate in these efforts.
 

Wednesday July 29, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Union Station Meeting Level 3

1:00pm

19: Teaching a Psychotherapy Designed for Elders: The CARE Model (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Teaching a Psychotherapy Designed for Elders: The CARE Model

Speakers: Andy Roth MD, Jimmie Holland MD, Christian J. Nelson PhD and Elizabeth Harvey PhD

This workshop proposes to teach attendees how to deliver a psycotherapy intervention designed specifically for elders with cancer, the CARE (Cancer and Aging: Refections for Elders) Model. Based on Erikson's developmental concepts, Folkman’s meaning based model of coping, and from interviews with "expert" elders, this five session intervention has been developed, and its feasibility and tolerability tested in a telephone format. Data from the randamized pilot study with 65 patients, followed at 2 and 4 months after the intervention, showed that those who received the intervention, as compared to standard care, had reduced depression and anxiety, demoralization and loneliness with an increase in coping and spiritual well being. Effect sizes were small to moderate (d=.2 to .5). The CARE Model concepts are applied to an on going clinical group, the Cancer and Aging Group, where innovations can be tried and tested. A subgroup now participate in the Vintage Readers Book Club, in which classics from literature (ie, the Harvard Classics of World Literature) are being read and discussed as a way to stimulate an activity at home and integrate into current personal and social issues, from a broader historical perspective. We anticipate the workshop will have two parts.

Part 1: Background for psychotherapies for elders and a description of the CARE Model with presentation of pilot results from 65 patients.

Part 2: Presentation of the manual and the content of each session with role play to illustrate how to conduct the key sessions. Innovations and other formats for delivery will be discussed, as well as opportunities for collaboration.

Workshop Objectives:

  • The participants in this workshop will learn the common psychosocial problems faced by elders with cancer, the Eriksonian theoretical base for the model, the Folkman model of meaning based coing, and the CARE clinical implementation with patients.
  • The audience will learn how to deliver the CARE Model: delivered by telephone or group; how to use the manual as a guide; and how to conduct key sessions on loss and isolation with role play.


Wednesday July 29, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Capitol Hill Meeting Level 3

1:00pm

20: Pediatric and Adolescent Psycho-Oncology Skills (Half-Day Workshop, PM)
Pediatric and Adolescent Psycho-Oncology Skills: Enhancing your Clinical and Intervention Repertoire, Discussing Challenging Cases and Considering Career Goals and Rewards

Speakers: Andrea Patenaude PhD, Joanna Breyer PhD, Lori Wiener PhD and Mary Jo Kupst PhD

Pediatric psycho-oncologists, researchers and pediatric oncologists will benefit from our lively review of best practices in working with children, adolescents and young adults with cancer, their parents, and siblings. The experienced presenters will discuss the provision of emotional and social support from diagnosis through treatment initiation and maintenance, transition home, survivorship and end of life care. Incorporated in the session will be mini- workshops offering interactive learning and initial training in evidence-based interventions in pediatric psycho-oncology. We will also offer small group discussion of challenging cases and ethical dilemmas. The workshop will also focus on use of fantasy play with children with cancer. We will also address providing support for families from rural or distant home communities, including international families. Research will support all presentations and we will discuss the challenges of integrating research and clinical careers and help attendees consider ways to begin to organize research on topics of clinical relevance.

Participants will be helped to learn interventions to bring to their home settings to enhance clinical care of their patients and self-care and career enhancement for professionals working in this exciting, but often stressful field. A list of useful references and resources (books, videos, articles, workbooks, games, online links.) will provide continuing access to state-of-the-art information for use with families and to address interests of providers. Emphasis will be on productive, interactive discussion and hands-on learning. 

Workshop Objectives:

  1. The attendee will enhance their awareness of developmental issues occurring at each stage for children undergoing cancer treatment and the challenges faced by parents of children of different ages who are coping with cancer.
  2. The attendee shall be able to understand essential elements of assessing emotional and support needs and coping skills and providing broad psychosocial treatment to children, adolescents and young adults with cancer, their parents and siblings.
  3. The attendee will have an introduction to state-of-the-art, evidence-based interventions to enhance patient/parent well-being, reduce distress and to support end of life planning for children and teens. They will also have an overview of recent research related to clinical care of families of children with cancer.
  4. The attendee shall understand the importance of self-care and supportive connections to colleagues in working within pediatric psycho-oncology.
  5. Attendees will have an opportunity to consider steps they might take to grow their professional network, to organize and present their work in professional meetings and conferences, to consider opportunities for cross-cultural and global health initiatives and to move their clinical experience into researchable questions and grant preparation.


Wednesday July 29, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
DuPont Circle Meeting Level 3

3:00pm

5:00pm

6:00pm

Opening Reception - All Attendees are Welcome!
Please join us for the IPOS/APOS World Congress of Psycho-Oncology Opening Reception from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm.  

New this year, we welcome three invited speakers:
  • Robert Croyle, PhD, Director of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). 
  • Crystal Mackall, MD, Chief of the Peadiatric Oncology Branch at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Gwen Darien, Executive Vice President of Programs and Services at the Cancer Support Community (CSC).
The Opening Reception entertainment includes a performance by DC-based Take the Stage Performance Company. This musical theater group showcases the top young talent from the Washinton DC area.

Tickets to the reception for Full Congress registrants is complimentary.  For one-day only registrants and any attendee's guests, tickets may be purchased for $35.00 each in advance or at the registration desk

Wednesday July 29, 2015 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

8:00pm

APOS Fellows Reception - By Invitation Only
Suite 9068 - Mark Lazenby private suite

Wednesday July 29, 2015 8:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA
 
Thursday, July 30
 

7:00am

APOS Bereavement Specialty Interest Group Meeting
The APOS Bereavement SIG invites conference attendees interested in clinical practice, education, and research related to death, dying, grief and bereavement in adults and pediatrics to join us.  New members welcome!  Please contact Wendy Lichtenthal (lichtenw@mskcc.org) for more information.

Thursday July 30, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Mount Vernon Square Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS Research Committee Meeting
Thursday July 30, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
LeDroit Park Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS World Congress Committee Meeting
Thursday July 30, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

7:00am

Wellness Session: Gentle Yoga - Separate Registration Required

Gentle Yoga for Wellness and Self-Care

Give your whole self the gift of nourishment from the inside out. Drawing upon yogic techniques for self-care and stress reduction, this class will help you tap into your body's natural capacity for renewal and rejuvenation, deepen your sense of calm, and enliven your essential vitality.  We will practice gentle and mindful movement, healing breathwork, delicious guided relaxation, and balancing meditation. Everybody welcome.

*Attendees are requested to bring a yoga mat. Towels will be provided by the hotel. 

Thursday July 30, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Capitol/Congress (Meeting Level 4)

7:00am

IPOS/APOS Pediatric Psycho-Oncology Specialty Interest Group Meeting
Come to meet other pediatric psycho-oncology providers and researchers and to help set an agenda for how we might want to raise the profile of pediatric presentations at IPOS/APOS and interact between meetings about topics of common interest. 

Thursday July 30, 2015 7:00am - 8:30am
Shaw Meeting Level 3

7:30am

8:00am

Exhibition Hours
Thursday July 30, 2015 8:00am - 4:00pm
Marquis Ballroom Meeting Level 2

8:30am

Delivering Patient-Centered, High-Quality Cancer Care: A 21st Century Challenge

This plenary presentation will provide an overview of the 2013 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report on “Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis,” with a focus on its recommendations related to patient-centered care.  The report provided a clarion call for critical issues facing the cancer care delivery system, building on IOM prior reports, including those on survivorship care and psychosocial care.  In the time since the report release, various entities have responded to the report recommendations, and those related to patient-centered care will be highlighted in this presentation.  The role of professional organizations, such as IPOS and APOS will be discussed.


Speaker: 
Patricia A. Ganz, MD, Director, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, UCLA Schools of Medicine & Public Health, USA

Thursday July 30, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:00am

10:40am

A: Body Image
A-1: Body Image in Irradiated Head and Neck Cancer Patients: The Impact of Surgical Procedures, T. Hung

A-2: A Longitudinal Examination of the Protective Effects of Hope and Optimism on Body Image Distress in a Mixed-cancer Population, R. Mahendran

A-3: Identifying Sociocultural Influences and Psychological Processes that Influence the Body Image of Women with Breast Cancer, H. Lewis-Smith

A-4: A Longitudinal Perspective of Body Image in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Reconstructive Surgery, I. Teo 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:40am

B: Decision Making and Information Provision
B-1: Prostate Cancer Decision-Making: A National Survey on Treatment and Research, D. Monticalvo

B-2: Psychological Distress, Age and Salience of Physical Appearance: Mediator and Moderator Effects of the BRECONDA Web-based Decision Aid for Women Considering Breast Reconstruction Following Mastectomy, K. Sherman

B-3: Use of Perceptual Mapping and Vector Modeling to Develop Message Strategies to Encourage Informed Decision Making for Clinical Trial Participation among African American Cancer Patients, S. Bass

B-4: Group Medical Consultations (GMCs) in Combination with Tablet-based Video GMCs as an Alternative for Individual Breast Cancer Follow-up Visits: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial, A. Visser 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:40am

C: Family, Partner, and Caregiver Issues #1
C-1: ProsCan Partners Study: Predicting Distress and Quality of Life for Partners of Men with Prostate Cancer up to 5 Years After Treatment, M. Hyde

C-2: Cancer Health-Care Professionals Providing Quality Care to Family Caregivers, J. Hanson

C-3: Coping, Optimism, and Quality of Life in Couples Managing Prostate Cancer, L. Song

C-4: Salivary Cortisol as Individual and Dyadic Markers of Stress and Health among Colorectal Cancer Patients and Their Caregivers, Y. Kim 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:40am

D: Pediatric Brain Cancer
D-1: Does Group Social Skills Intervention for Children with Brain Tumors Improve Quality of Life? A Randomized Controlled Trial, M. Barrera

D-2: Differential Effect of Brain Radiation on Social Skills and Quality of Life of Children Affected by Brain Tumors, M. Barrera

D-3: Neurofeedback not Effective in Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors: Results of a Double-blind Randomized Sham-controlled Trial, M. de Ruiter

D-4: Deficits in Executive Functioning and Effortful Control: Explaining Emotional Adjustment in Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors (PBTS), E. Semmel 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 15

10:40am

S1: The Role of Peer Support in Survivorship Care
10:40 (5 mins) Introduction by the Chair/Discussant: Prof Jeff Dunn, AO
Peer support has a long tradition in community based support for people affected by cancer. However this approach has until recently, been largely neglected in research and cancer care guidelines, policy and planning documents.  As the cancer burden increases alongside fiscal constraints, peer support is set to move to prominence as an accessible, effective and affordable model of care.  Understanding and further developing effective and sustainable peer support interventions will be essential if we are to accelerate progress in providing cancer support to those affected across the globe and achieving World Cancer Declaration targets.

10:45 (20 mins) S1-1: Peer Support as a Clinically-sponsored Intervention,Cathy Hirsch, Reach to Recovery International, USA
Cathy’s presentation will discuss the natural tendency of patients facing serious illness to seek emotional support and information from others who experienced similar circumstances, as well as the advantages of providing organized, established peer support programs at the community level.

11:05 (20 mins) S1-2: Maximising Effectiveness in Peer Support: Practical Considerations, Prof Suzanne Chambers, Professor of Preventative Health, Griffith University, AU
Suzanne’s presentation will provide articulation points for researchers seeking to evaluate the impact of peer support in cancer and for designing methodologies underpinned by theory that match how peer support is expressed and consumed.

11:25 (20 mins) S1-3: Putting Peer Support Online: The Importance of Internet Literacy, Dr Stephen Lepore, Professor of Public Health and Director of Social and Behavioral Health Interventions Laboratory, Temple University, USA
Stephen will present data from an online breast cancer support intervention which shows a positive relationship between internet literacy and improvements in symptoms of depression and anxiety.   

11:45 (20 mins) S1-4: The Role of Peer Support for Physical Well-Being after Cancer, Dr Kevin Stein, American Cancer Society, US
Kevin’s presentation will focus on understanding how physical activity can improve overall physical health and the use of peer mentors/coaches and online peer support programs.  

12:05 (20 mins) Closing Comments by Symposium Chair 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:40am

S2: Cancer-focused Assessment, Decision Aids, and Support Using Web-based Systems
The use of technology has been growing rapidly in the field of psycho-oncology.  Numerous eHealth options are being created, evaluated and utilized, including those for assessment, decision aids, treatment and the provision of support.  This session will highlight a number of eHealth programs across these areas from around the world.  Dr. Tania Estapé, from Spain, will chair this session and present data on online psychological assessment in cancer patients and arguments to analyze "online" profiles.  Dr. Leslie Schover, from the US, will present on her intervention for cancer-related male sexual problems.  Dr. Addie Wootten, from Australia, will focus on a prostate cancer portal her team created and highlight issues of uptake, barriers, and stigma.  Dr. Claire Foster, from the UK, will present on web based decision aids to support young women diagnosed with breast cancer.  Dr. Lee Ritterband, Professor and Director of the Behavioral Health and Technology Laboratory at the University of Virginia, will be discussant, and provide an overview to the current state of the field and what the future may hold.

Chair: Tania Estapé
Discussant: Lee M. Ritterband

S2-1: Developing an Internet-Based Intervention for Cancer-Related Male Sexual Problems, L. Schover
S2-2: Using Web-enabled Technology to Support Men with Prostate Cancer: PROSTMATE, A. Wootten
S2-3: Psychological Assessment Via Internet, T.Estapé
S2-4: Web-based Decision Aids to Support Young Women with Breast Cancer, C, Foster
 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:40am

S3: Psychosocial Distress Screening in the Community Cancer Setting: Creating a Real-time Resource for Community-Based Providers
The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) enlisted the American Psychological Association (APOS) to assist in a project to identify model programs for distress screening of cancer patients among ACCC sites. The ACCC has 680 cancer program members and has a stated purpose of being the leading education and advocacy organization for the multidisciplinary cancer team. The goal of the project was to identify 3 model programs that could serve as resources to other ACCC programs with regard to screening.

Chair: Teresa Deshields
Discussant: Mark Lazenby

S3-1: ACCC's Overview of Psychosocial Distress Screening in the Community Cancer Setting, M. Gandee
S3-2: What Can We Learn from Model Programs for Distress Screening?, T. Deshields
S3-3: Distress Screening from Paper/Pencil to EHR Integration, J. Kendall
S3-4: What Does an Optimal Model for Distress Screening Look Like?  Developing Selection Criteria to Determine Best Practice, L. Padgett

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:40am

S4: Psychological Reactions to Recurrent and Metastatic Cancer: A New Challenge in Cancer Survivorship
Response to the diagnosis of recurrent or metastatic disease is qualitatively different for survivors from that associated with initial diagnosis of cancer (Thornton et al., 2014).  Available data suggest that in contrast to initial diagnosis, patients with recurrent/metastatic cancer have lower functional status and report more pain, fatigue and relationship problems (Frost et al., 2000; Northouse et al., 2002; Sarenmalm et al., 2008).  Despite the psychological importance of a diagnosis of recurrence or metastatic disease to the cancer patient, there is little psychosocial research on the subject.
Following introductory remarks, the proposed symposium presents research on depression, social support, and emotion regulation in patients with recurrent/metastatic cancer, ending with outcome data from an intervention trial.  Longitudinal data from diagnosis through one year are presented.  The first presentation will discuss relationships between illness-related disruption of social/recreational activities and depressive symptoms in women with Stage IV breast cancer.  The second presentation will compare the impact of emotion regulation on quality of life in patients with recurrent cancer versus metastatic disease. The third presentation will describe a study of the mechanisms by which social support may be related to physical health outcomes in women with breast cancer recurrence. The final presentation will provide the results of a 20-session mindfulness- and hope-based intervention specifically designed for patients with recurrent cancer.  Together, this research provides a unique picture of socioemotional reactions to recurrent/metastatic cancer, as well as a novel treatment for addressing such reactions and enhancing quality of life.

Chair: Julia Rowland
Discussant: Neil Aaronson

S4-1: Social Support, Health, and Recurrent Breast Cancer: Understanding Psychological and Biological Mechanisms, C. Dorfman
S4-2: The Mediating Effects of Emotion Regulation in Cancer Recurrence, C. Conley
S4-3: Test of Mindfulness and Hope Components in a Psychological Intervention for Women with Cancer Recurrence, B. Andersen
S4-4: Depressive Symptoms, Goal Engagement, and Activity Disruption in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer, A. Stanton 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

12:10pm

12:10pm

APOS Professional Education Committee
Thursday July 30, 2015 12:10pm - 1:40pm
Mount Vernon Square Meeting Level 3

12:10pm

IPOS Early Career Professionals Committee Meeting

The Early Career Professionals in Psycho-oncology (ECPP) SIG is an inter-disciplinary group dedicated to heightening awareness of, and advocating for, issues of particular importance to ECPPs. This meeting will involve a review of activities of the past year and brainstorming ideas for the upcoming year. It will be an excellent opportunity for networking and to become actively involved in the group and its activities. New members welcome!


Thursday July 30, 2015 12:10pm - 1:40pm
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

12:10pm

12:30pm

APOS Meet the Experts Mentoring Lunch - Separate Registration Required
Join APOS experts for an informal round-table style mentoring session held over the World Congress lunch break on Thursday, 30 July 2015. Attendees can sign up to spend time with experts in the field and learn from their expertise, skills and experience by logging in to the Registration page

Thursday July 30, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Shaw Meeting Level 3

12:40pm

IPOS Annual Business Meeting of Members - All Attendees are Welcome!
Join the IPOS President and Board of Directors for the Annual Business Meeting of Members, held during the World Congress lunch break on Thursday, 30 July 2015.

Thursday July 30, 2015 12:40pm - 1:40pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

1:40pm

Psychosocial Care as a Human Rights Issue - Challenges and Opportunities

The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support within IPOS and the IPOS Federation for the relevance of Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Human Rights issue. We seek to advocate for this issue internationally and nationally through existing Human Rights laws, in a fashion similar to what has been done by the organized palliative care movement. In November 2014 at the World Congress of Psycho-oncology in Lisbon, Portugal, the IPOS Board endorsed the “Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Human Right”.  In this session we will discuss psychosocial care as a human rights issue, the challenges and opportunities in different contexts, and how to move forward a declaration towards its implementation into clinical practice globally.

Chair: Luzia Travado  PhD, IPOS President; Champalimaud Cancer Center, Lisbon, Portugal

Discussant: Michelle Fingeret PhD, APOS President; University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX, USA  

Speakers:

William Breitbart MD: 

The IPOS Lisbon Declaration of Psychosocial care as a Human Rights Issue

Dr. Breitbart, Chairman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, is chair of the IPOS Human Rights Task Force. He will describe the details of the Lisbon Declaration and the plan for dissemination and creation of an international community of supporters from individuals, organizations and advocacy groups globally.

Andrea Patenaude, PhD:  Defining psychosocial care as a human right for children with cancer: Illustration of challenges at the extremes 
Dr. Patenaude, Director of Psychology Research and Clinical Services, Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA USA, is member of IPOS Human Rights Task Force, will describe ongoing human rights challenges in Africa and worldwide facing children with cancer and their parents. 

In many parts of the world it remains standard to deny children with cancer the right to know what their diagnosis is, what the treatments are they will receive and what their current status and likely outcome of their cancer will be. Part of the imperative for children with cancer to receive concurrent psychosocial care involves their need to have a caring, informed, trusted adult with whom they can discuss their feelings and fears about being ill, having cancer and enduring cancer treatment and about possible separation from family members and peers. Beyond the right to accurate medical information there are many examples of challenges to the ethical care of children with cancer. In Kenya, there are repeated reports of the detention of children with cancer in hospital after they have completed treatment, often without the comforting presence of their parents or much attention from hospital staff, because their parents have been unable to pay the hospital bill. This represents an extreme denial of human rights to both children and parents. In more developed countries, less extreme but important ethical issues arise in the psychosocial care of children with cancer about how to define minimal, essential services which should be available to all children with cancer. We will discuss these ethical challenges for pediatric cancer patients and their family members and the importance of universal psychosocial care for children enduring the stresses of cancer. 

Lea Baider PhD: Cancer Care:  Human Rights within the Cultural and Religious Beliefs  of the Middle East 
Dr. Baider, is Full Professor Health Psychology, Director Psychosocial Department at Assuta Medical Center,Tel-Aviv, Israel. As a member of the IPOS Human Rights Task Force she will discuss specific Human Rights challenges for women in the Middle east with cancer and their ability to receive supportive cancer care. 

Human Rights ethics now face the increasingly relevant challenge of pursuing how to handle conflicts that are deeply embedded in diverse cultural and religious outlooks on life and death. Health care is rife with cultural differences and potential conflicts that must be considered in order to provide effective psychosocial care.. The most intimate events of life -  reproduction, birth and death - draw us into the health care system and expose the most fundamental attitudes, moral values and beliefs. Religion, and systems of beliefs also directly affect psychological and physical health, for they influence coping strategies, social and family behaviour, and health attitudes. As with the Middle East, many societies are becoming increasingly multi ethnic, and multicultural. The family system of beliefs and health rituals in the Muslim countries, may appear "unscientific" and contradictory in comparison to the "evidence-based" western medical care.  There is then, a risk of misunderstanding and conflict, particularly when Human Rights are totally ingrained with traditional norms of behaviour, and within the society traditional cultural and religious values. 

Luigi Grassi, MD: Psychosocial care as a Human Rights Issue Around the World: the IPOS Federation perspective 
 ***Daisuke Fujisawa MD PhD (Japan) will be presenting in place of Luigi Grassi MD

Psychological distress, anxiety and anguish, helplessness-hopelessness conditions and depression, difficulty in coping and adjustment affect at least 30% of cancer patients. Furthermore, psychosocial needs (including feeling of meaninglessness, lack of purpose, dependency, loss of social role functioning, feeling a burden to others) are common but, extremely  frequently, unexplored and unmet in cancer settings. These aspects are reported in all the phases of cancer, with particular reference to palliative care. The main consequence of this situation is a negative impact on quality life, on the sense of self and on the perception of one’s own dignity, as the whole of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual/ existential issues. Many of the statements related to human rights declaration in mental health, such as the right to be treated with dignity as a human being; the right of everyone to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health; and the right to have to psychosocial  services and psychosocial intervention in the event of sickness, are also part of psychosocial oncology programs in many different parts of the world. One of the roles of the federation of psych-oncology societies is to help those countries where psychosocial oncology is less developed and psychosocial needs of cancer patients and their families not explored and/or not addressed.

Stephen R Connor PhD:  The Next Steps: Implementing Declarations into Practical Clinical Care Changes Globally- The Palliative Care WHO Experience 

Dr. Connor is Senior Fellow to Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA), and Member of the new WHO Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Palliative and Long Term Care. He has worked in hospice and palliative care for the past 38 years as a licensed clinical psychologist, researcher, executive, advocate, consultant, educator, and author. He is also an international palliative care consultant to the (Soros) Open Society Foundations. 

Connor will describe the experience of the palliative care field in moving Human Rights advocacy from “Declarations” to practical clinical implementation globally. The session will draw parallels between the experience of the international palliative care community’s advocacy efforts to advance palliative care globally and the IPOS’s efforts to advance psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue.

Like IPOS the WHPCA’s advocacy began with a Seoul declaration in 2005 calling access to palliative care a human right. The WHPCA emerged as an alliance of national and regional hospice and palliative care associations after the Seoul meeting of the Asia Pacific Hospice Network and was formalized as a UK charity in 2009. A series of global summits and further declarations on palliative care (including the EAPC/IAHPC Prague Charter “Palliative Care as a Human Right”) were held. Work began to create a stronger international voice for palliative care and WHPCA was admitted into official relations with WHO in 2012.

From 2011 to 2014 the global palliative care community, working with Human Rights Watch, pushed to have a stand-alone resolution brought before the World Health Assembly (WHA). In May of 2014 the WHA unanimously passed a resolution calling on member states to “Strengthen Palliative Care as a Component of Comprehensive Care Throughout the Life Course.” The resolution was based on a report from WHO that used the Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life, a joint WHO/WHPCA publication and calls on countries to use a public health approach to advancing palliative care in policy, education, medicines availability, and implementation. Implementation of the resolution has recently begun and will be described. 

...

Thursday July 30, 2015 1:40pm - 3:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:10pm

3:50pm

E: Cancer Prevention
E-1: Tailoring Tobacco Cessation Interventions for Special Populations served by Federally Qualified Health Centers, M. Pratt-Chapman

E-2: Managing Women’s Uncertainty during Genetic Counseling Sessions for BRCA Testing, C. Fisher

E-3: Acceptance Patterns and Decision-making for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Canadian Parents: A Stages of Change Model, S. Perez

E-4: Media Representation of the HPV Vaccine: A Content Analysis of Canadian Newspapers, S. Perez

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:50pm

F: Delivery of Psychosocial Care
F-1: Finding My Way: A Mixed-methods Interim Analysis of Predictors of Adherence to an Online Psychological Intervention for Cancer-related Distress, L. Beatty

F-2: Assessing Institutional Capacity to Implement Psychosocial Support Services: The National Cancer Institute Psychosocial Care Matrix, B. Zebrack

F-3: Cancer Patients’ Reasons for Acceptance or Decline of Psychological Intervention: An Interview Study, R. Brebach

F-4: The Psychosocial Matrix: Longitudinal Study of Use within the NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP), L. Padgett 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 14

3:50pm

G: Family, Partner, and Caregiver Issues #2
G-1: Information and Its Impact on Co-survivors of Cancer Patients, D. D'Souza

G-2: Contradictions of Morality in Mother-Daughter Breast Cancer Coping:  A Dialectical Perspective of the “Right” Way to Cope, B. Wolf

G-3: Evaluation of Truce: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Program for Young People who have a Parent with Cancer, P. Patterson

G-4: The Association between Family Caregiver Burden and the Survival of Advanced Cancer Patients, J. Dionne-Odom

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:50pm

H: Sexual and Urinary Function
H-1: Sex and Head and Neck Cancer: The Lived Experience of Survivors, B. Rhoten

H-2: Intimacy and Sexual  Dysfunction in  Bladder Cancer Patients Treated with Cystectomy, M.Grant

H-3: Decrease in Intercourse Satisfaction in Men who Recover Erections after Radical Prostatectomy, C. Benedict

H-4: Effects of Patient-Centered Interventions on Persistent Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Treatment, A. Zhang

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Archives

3:50pm

S5: Research Methods in Supportive Oncology: Highlights from the MGH Workshop
Despite major advances in our understanding of cancer and its treatment, patients with cancer continue to report suffering from the symptoms of fatigue, pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression, and poor appetite. Supportive oncology (i.e., psychosocial oncology, palliative care, symptom management, and survivorship) research and interventions have the potential to alleviate these symptoms and mitigate their ramifications. However, the evidence base for supportive oncology practices is still relatively small, especially in comparison to that for medical oncology. More researchers are needed with the necessary skills for designing, conducting, and analyzing scientifically sound studies in supportive oncology are needed. This symposium provides highlights from the NCI-funded MGH Workshop on Research Methods in Supportive Oncology, an intensive 6-day training experience for early-stage investigators. The talks selected for this symposium address key aspects in planning an intervention study: behavioral theories and conceptual models which guide intervention development; approaches to data analysis; and practical considerations for successful clinical trials. This symposium is geared towards individuals with an interest, but limited experience, in research. After the talks there will be opportunities for attendees to ask questions related to their own research ideas.

Chair/Discussant: William Pirl

S5-1: Developing a Quantitative Analytic Plan that Corresponds to Study Aims and Design, L. Traeger

S5-2: Performing a Successful Supportive Care Clinical Trial, J. Temel 

S5-3: Applications of Behavioral Theory and Conceptual Models in Supportive Oncology Research, J. Greer
 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:50pm

S6: Where Do We Stand with Families? Advancing Family-Centered Care in Cancer and Bereavement
Chair: Talia Zaider
Discussant: Lea Baider

S6-1: Family Cancer Caregivers’ Long-term Adjustment to Bereavement, Y. Kim

S6-2: Outcomes of Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Focused Grief Therapy in Palliative Care and Bereavement, D. Kissane

S6-3: Advancing the Role of Oncology Nurses in Supporting the Family: Results of Family-Focused Training Interventions Piloted in the Acute Care Setting, T. Zaider

S6-4: A Longitudinal Analysis of Widowed Fathers Due to Cancer: 6 and 12 Month Follow-up, J. Yopp

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:50pm

S7: Delivering Psychosocial Care in Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology: Unique International Challenges and Opportunities
Worldwide, pediatric and adolescent/young adult (AYA) cancer affects over 160,000 families each year,1 who experience a complex constellation of psychosocial needs. Despite considerable progress in pediatric/adolescent psycho-oncology, a number of vulnerable populations continue to ‘fall through the cracks’.  For example, emerging research indicates that young children’s distress during cancer treatment may be missed if screening methodologies do not ask the right questions, in the right ways (talk one). Other groups may experience significant psychosocial needs that are unaddressed due to complex developmental factors, and their lack of ‘critical mass’ within treatment-settings, such as AYAs with cancer (talk two). Other sub-groups remain underserviced within pediatric psycho-oncology due to their ‘dislocation’ within the system, such as bereaved parents (talk three) and grandparents of children with cancer (talk four). The unique needs of these groups offer both distinct challenges, and important opportunities, in developing and implementing effective intervention strategies in complex settings. This symposium showcases four innovative studies, each addressing a neglected, underserviced population, and with a focus on translating standards into evidence-based practice.

Addressing recent international consensus that the ‘6th vital sign’ of distress be measured, documented and treated at each clinical contact, Talk one examines the development and validation of an evidence-based tool to quickly and accurately assess a child’s distress, from their own perspective, during cancer treatment. Talk two presents a case-series of ethical and clinical challenges from a large-scale randomized-controlled trial of an online cognitive-behavioural therapy group intervention for AYAs with cancer. The management of these ethical/clinical challenges is discussed with relation to international practice-standards for psychologists in e-mental health. The symposium then turns to the needs of underserviced groups. Talk three presents a multisite study evaluating the impact of different bereavement services/interventions for parents in the aftermath of their child’s cancer. Finally, Talk four focuses on the development, evaluation, and community-based dissemination of a novel intervention to address grandparent’s informational and psychological needs following their grandchild’s cancer diagnosis.

Integrating qualitative and quantitative methodologies, this symposium addresses the impact of cancer across multiple stages of the translational-science research continuum, from important Phase I discovery research (Talks one and three), to Phase II trials evaluating novel interventions (Talks two and four), through to a program of dissemination research evaluating the real-world impact of new models of care and support (Talks three and four).

1.Ferlay J et al.GLOBOCAN 2002: Cancer incidence,mortality and prevalence worldwide.IARC Cancer Base N°5,V.2.0. Lyon, IARC Press. 2004.

Chair: Ursula Sansom-Daly
Discussant: Lori Wiener

S7-1: Translation of Research to Practice for Grandparents of Children with Cancer: National Dissemination and Evaluation of a New Resource, C. Wakefield

S7-2: Recreating Life After Death: The Place of Professional and Social Support In the Lives of Parents Following the Death of a Child From Cancer, L. Donovan

S7-3: Clinical Challenges in Implementing Psychosocial Support in the Online Space: Experiences from the ‘Recapture Life’ Trial, U. Sansom-Daly

S7-4: The Development of a Pediatric Screen: Next Generation Distress Thermometer?, S. Zadeh 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:50pm

S8: Managing an Increased Risk of Breast Cancer: Stress Reduction and Risk Reducing Surgery Decisions
Women from high risk breast families, with or without a BRCA1/2 mutation, need to manage their risk, yet little is known about how they understand, conceptualise and make decisions about risk. This symposium explores this issue from multiple perspectives, using mixed Australian and US data, and reporting new results from a very large, prospective study of high risk women.

Chair: Phyllis Butow
Discussant: Mary Jane Esplen

S8-1: Risk Perception in Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer: Intuitive Versus Cognitive, P. Butow

**S8-2: Does Stress Cause Cancer? A 15 Year Prospective Study of Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer, P. Butow

S8-3: Factors Associated with the Decision to have Risk Reducing Mastectomy or Oopherectomy, M. Price

S8-4: Prophylactic Mastectomy Decision-Making: What Help do Women Need?, A. Patendaude

**S8-2 will be presented first.



Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:50pm

S9: Early Career Professionals in Psycho-Oncology: Some “How To’s” to Support Career Development
Psycho-oncology is a field that affords significant opportunities for innovation and impact. Early career researchers and clinicians in particular have the potential to contribute innovative ideas as the field continues to grow. The development of well-supported and skilful workforce will help address the vast psychosocial needs of cancer patients, survivors, and family members throughout the world. However, early career professionals in psycho-oncology (ECPPs) are often faced with formidable challenges in establishing their careers and building expertise. This is made more difficult in the absence of clear career pathways for ECPPs, which can leave ECPPs feeling unsupported. In addition to the key issue of limited access to resources, many ECPPs are also managing internal battles regarding disappointment and rejection and feelings of inadequacy. It is evident that ECPPs are in need of support.

Having recognised this need, a group of active and enthusiastic ECPPs, supported by IPOS, formed the IPOS ECPP Committee to promote the needs of early career researchers and clinicians commencing a career in psycho-oncology. The group has representation from Europe, North America, Asia, Africa and Australia. The mandate of the IPOS ECPP Committee is to heighten awareness of and advocate for issues of particular importance to early career professionals, with special attention to the varied challenges that international ECPPs may face.

Chair: Michelle Peate
Discussant: Barry Bultz

S9-1: “How can we support you, let us count the ways”: The Challenges Faced and Resources Available to ECPPs in Limited-resource Countries, M. Chittem

S9-2: Surviving the Early Years in Psycho-Oncology: Fakin’ It ‘Til You Make It, W. Lichtenthal

S9-3: Securing Funding for Your Research, J. Rowland   

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

6:30pm

Gala Dinner - Separate Registration Required

Join us as we cruise along the Potomac in the exquisite glass-enclosed Odyssey River Cruise.  View historic landmarks through the crystal clear glass or from the observation deck around the perimeter of the ship.  The Odyssey cruises north, and the Georgetown waterfront and Lincoln Memorial are among the most beautiful attractions at night.

Schedule:
6:30 PM - Buses depart from the Marriott Marquis Washington
7:00 PM – Dock Departure
7:00 – 10:00 pm – Dinner Cruise
10:00 pm – Buses depart for the Marriott Marquis Washington

Attire:  For women, cocktail wear, a dress or dressy-casual attire is appropriate. For men, collared shirts and dress pants are recommended. Nice, designer jeans are acceptable. However, casual jeans, t-shirts, athletic shoes or flip flops are discouraged.

Cost:  $150 per person (Price includes dinner, live music, complimentary beer and wine)


Thursday July 30, 2015 6:30pm - 10:00pm
Odyssey Cruise of Washington D.C. Potomac River
 
Friday, July 31
 

7:00am

APOS Spirituality Special Interest Group

The Spirituality SIG is an inter-disciplinary group dedicated to understanding the religious and spiritual needs of cancer patients and their families.  The meeting will review activities of the previous year, brainstorm ideas for the upcoming year, and provide time for networking.  New members strongly welcomed!


Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Shaw Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS Early Career Psycho-Oncology Professional Poster Session

We are pleased to announce that IPOS Early Career Psycho-oncology Professionals Committee is organizing 5 minute oral presentations opportunities for early career professionals. The aim of this event is to enable early career psycho-oncology professionals to present and share their work with the audience.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE?

You are eligible if:

  • You are a psycho-oncology professional (including PhD students) within ten years of your highest degree;
  • Your abstract has been awarded as a poster presentation at the 2015 World Congress.

Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Chinatown Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS Liaison Committee Meeting
Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS WHO Committee Meeting
Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Capitol Hill Meeting Level 3

7:00am

IPOS/APOS e-Health Special Interest Group Meeting
The combined IPOS/APOS e-Health SIG meeting will facilitate attendee discussions of the use of e-health technology (internet, telemedicine, social media) to deliver oncology supportive care services, including distress screening, patient/family education and support groups, stress management/coping interventions, individual psychotherapy, and others. Please come prepared to discuss your interests, research, and/or care delivery projects using e-health technology. This will be an informal discussion.  

Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
DuPont Circle Meeting Level 3

7:00am

Wellness Session: Mindfulness - Separate Registration Required
Mindfulness refers to the ability to "pay attention, on purpose and non-judgmentally, to whatever is going on in the present moment."   This 1 hour session, designed both for those with meditation experience as well as for people new to meditation, will consist of  a guided mindfulness meditation, plus time to discuss uses of mindfulness in psycho-oncology, both in self-care for providers, and in working with our patients. 

Friday July 31, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Capitol/Congress (Meeting Level 4)

7:00am

7:00am

8:00am

Exhibition Hours
Friday July 31, 2015 8:00am - 6:00pm
Marquis Ballroom Meeting Level 2

8:30am

Town Hall Meeting: Goals of Psychosocial Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Disease Around the World

In this Town Hall Plenary session, Cokie Roberts (Journalist, Author, Breast Cancer Survivor) will moderate a discussion with palliative care experts that will cover goals of palliative care through the lifespan, current research that has informed changes in practice, barriers to implementing change, and innovative responses to barriers to change around the globe.  

Speakers for this plenary include Jamie von Roenn, Dr. Stein Kaasa, Joanne Wolfe, Irene  Higginson

Dr. Joanne Wolfe:

Dr. Joanne Wolfe is the Chief of the Division of Pediatric Palliative Care in the Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and the Director of Palliative Care at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH), and is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.  She holds an MD degree (1990) from Harvard Medical School and an MPH (1998) from the Harvard School of Public Health.  The Pediatric Advanced Care Team (PACT), the palliative care service which she directs, received a 2001 Citation of Honor from the American Hospital Association’s Circle of Life Awards program for its innovative approach to caring for children with life-threatening illness. 

Dr. Wolfe developed the first interdisciplinary pediatric palliative care fellowship program in North America.  She co-developed the Pediatric Track of the Program for Palliative Care Education and Practice a continuing medical education course offered through the Harvard Center for Palliative Care.  She is also a co-investigator on the EPEC-Pediatrics Project, an on-line and face-to-face curriculum which aims to enhance primary pediatric palliative care knowledge, skills and behaviors among pediatric clinicians and subspecialists. 

Dr Wolfe’s research is focused on easing suffering and promoting wellbeing in children with serious illness and their families. She co-directs an emerging pediatric palliative care research network, “Peppercorn”. Dr Wolfe was the recipient of the 2013 American Cancer Society’s Pathfinder in Palliative Care Award and the 2014 AAHPM Award for Excellence in Scientific Research.

Professor Irene J Higginson OBE: 

Irene Higginson qualified in medicine from Nottingham University and has worked in wide ranging medical and university positions, including radiotherapy and oncology, in-patient and home hospice care, the Department of Health (England), and various universities. She is dual-trained in palliative medicine and public health medicine.  She has developed and validated two outcome measures both freely available and used widely in palliative care: the Support Team Assessment Schedule and the Palliative care Outcome Scale (see www.pos-pal.org). She is Director of the Cicely Saunders Institute, at King’s College London, the world’s first purpose-built Institute of palliative care, integrating research, education, clinical services and support and information. Prof. Higginson is an NIHR Senior Investigator and was in 2013 awarded Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences, for her contribution to the field. She has several active research programmes, leads the MSc, Diploma and Certificate in Palliative Care, supervises several PhD students and is active in teaching.  Prof. Higginson has published over 400 articles in peer-reviewed journals, plus several books; her research interests and publications are in the following areas: quality of life and outcome measurements, evaluation of palliative care especially of new services and interventions, epidemiology, clinical audit, effectiveness, psychosocial care, symptom assessment, breathlessness, cachexia/anorexia, and elderly care. She plays an active role in the clinical service, including on-call.  

Dr. Stein Kaasa:

Dr. Jamie von Roenn: 

Dr. Von Roenn is board certified in internal medicine, medical oncology and palliative medicine. She was a professor of medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, co-director of the cancer control program at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago, Illinois and Director of the Palliative Medicine Fellowship Training Program at Northwestern.  In 2013 she moved to DC and is now at ASCO, as Senior Director of Education, Science and Professional Development. She has been involved in palliative medicine since the 1980s.


Friday July 31, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:00am

10:40am

I: Cancer Screening and Navigation
I-1: The Impact of Gender and Race on Diagnosing Colon Cancer during a Primary Care Visit, M.Thomson

I-2: Patient Navigator Competencies: Differences in Role Perception across Health Professions, M. Pratt-Chapman

I-3: Utilization of Screening Services for Breast and Cervical Cancers among Non-Academic Female Staff of Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria, J. Terwase

I-4: Patient Navigation: Scope of Practice as Members of the Oncology Multidisciplinary Care Team, E. Rohan

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:40am

J: Depression and Anxiety
J-1: Use of Prescription Medications for treating Anxiety and Depression among Self-Identified Cancer Survivors in the National Health Interview Survey 2010-2013, N. Hawkins

J-2: A Randomised Trial of a Psychosocial Intervention for Depressed Cancer Patients Integrated into Routine Care, J. Turner

J-3: Relations between Depression and Healthcare use in Patients Diagnosed with Cancer, B. Mausbach

J-4: Modality of Exercise Influences Rate of Decrease in Depression for Cancer Survivors with Elevated Depressive Symptomatology, G. Levin  

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:40am

K: Fertility Preservation and Reproductive Health
K-1: When Ethical Dilemmas Split Teams: Case Studies of Fertility Preservation In the Context of Metastatic Cancer, F. Meyer

K-2: Individual and Workplace Changes: Results of a Nurse Reproductive Health Training Program Follow-Up Survey, I. Sehvoic

K-3: Impact of the ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare) Web- Based Training Program, M. Bowman

K-4:  Young Adult Female Cancer Survivors’ Pre-treatment Fertility-related Experiences Relate to Decision Regret about Fertility Preservation in Post-treatment Survivorship, C. Benedict

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:40am

L: Screening for Distress and Unmet Needs #1
L-1: Translating Distress Screening into Cancer Care: An Implementation Case Study at Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia, M. Hyde

L-2: Is there a Case for Psycho-oncology in India? Establishing the Proof of Concept, B. Sitaram

L-3: Multicultural Validation of the Pediatric Parenting Stress Inventory (PPSI) in Childhood Cancer, M. Dolgin

L-4: The Distress Screening Program Lowers Distress, Depression, and Anxiety in Brazilian Oncology Patients During Primary Treatment, C. Bergerot

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 15

10:40am

S10: The Development of Childhood Cancer Psychosocial Clinical Care Standards
In 2012 The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation (MMCF) held a Congressional Symposium on Capitol Hill that addressed the current state of pediatric psycho-oncology. Legislators and their staff members cited the lack of established standards is an impediment to initiating legislation to make psychosocial care an essential component of the medical care of children with cancer in U.S. cancer centers.

Since then, MMCF, working with a group of pediatric oncology psychosocial experts have collaborated to develop a comprehensive set of standards for the psychosocial care of children with cancer based on available evidence and, when that is insufficient, on professional consensus. Two in-person meetings were held in 2013 and 2014 and five working groups were established which have included over 40 multidisciplinary experts and patient advocates. Working groups also met regularly by teleconference to examine and synthesize the professional literature and related professional mandates, in order to create and provide evidence for psychosocial standards and to identify areas where more research is needed.

In this symposium, the MMCF Founders (Peter and Vicki Sardi-Brown) will present history behind the project, provide a summary of the current status of the project, and discuss hopes for implementation. The project leaders (Drs. Lori Wiener, Anne Kazak, Andrea Farkas Patenaude, Robert Noll and Mary Jo Kupst) will describe the process used to develop the currently recommended standards for the psychosocial care of children with cancer, including how the literature reviews were conducted, consensus calls, and the appraisal of the existing supporting literature. Each of the standards will be presented along with a summary of the evidence found. Implementation strategies and approaches to address barriers to implementation will also be reviewed. Key domains where there is insufficient evidence and future research needed will be discussed.

The timing for creating standards is critical. In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer (CoC) will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation. The American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) recently announced recommendations to support a new criterion for cancer center accreditation. APOS, IPOS, along with the Association of Oncology Social Workers (AOSW) and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) endorse the new Commission on Cancer standard of psychosocial distress screening. With these new requirements, cancer clinics are seeking guidance on the development of psychosocial care programs; the proposed standards developed under the auspices of the Mattie Miracle Foundation and professional experts are ideally focused to meet this need.

Chair: Lori Wiener
Discussant: Paul Jacobsen 

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:40am

S11: What Do We Know About Suicide After Cancer?: Understanding the Challenges Across the Treatment Trajectory
Suicidal thoughts and impulses are among the most challenging psychological symptoms in cancer patients.  Though research has shown for decades that a cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for suicide, the problem is not widely addressed and medical professionals working with cancer patients often feel unprepared to understand and respond to suicidal symptoms in their patients.  Appropriately managing suicidal symptoms can be very demanding, often requiring a risk assessment, urgent or emergent mental health care, while also raising concerns about medical symptom management, professional ethics, patient autonomy, and legal liability.  Moreover, much suicide research and interventions to prevent suicide have been conducted with individuals with psychiatric rather than medical conditions, making it difficult to know how well this literature fits with oncology settings or patients.

To improve understanding of suicidal symptoms in cancer patients, this symposium presents three speakers addressing the challenge of suicidal symptoms across the continuum of care from diagnosis and treatment to long-term survivorship and end-of-life care. Andrew Roth (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA), author of several studies on empirically based treatment for depression in cancer patients, will present his recent work on managing risk for suicide in cancer paitents.  Christopher Recklitis (Harvard Medical School, USA) whose work focuses on behavioral outcomes in cancer survivors, will present on the persistence of suicide risk into the survivorship period and the relationship of suicidal symptoms to medical late-effects.  Keith Wilson (Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada), an expert on behavioral health intervention in palliative care, will present on the different ways patients’ may experience a desire for death, including the wish for physician-hastened death.  Each presentation will highlight the challenges in conceptualizing, assessing, and managing suicidal symptoms that are relevant to each phase of cancer treatment.  The symposium discussant, Donald Rosenstein (University of North Carolina Medical School, USA) an expert in psychosomatic medicine and consult-liaison psychiatry, will provide critical commentary on the presentations, putting the findings in the larger context of what is known about suicide in psychiatric and medically ill-populations.  Finally, Dr. Rosenstein will facilitate a question and answer session allowing attendees to comment on the presentations or ask their own questions of the speakers.  Although cancer patients are at increased risk, suicide remains an understudies topic in cancer care; this symposium will inform attendees of the most recent empirical findings on suicidal symptoms in cancer patients and provide information directly relevant to their psycho-oncology research and practice.

Chair: Christopher Recklitis
Discussant: Donald Rosenstein

S11-1: Surviving Cancer but Succumbing to Suicide: What Explains the Risk in Long-Term Survivors?, C. Recklitis

S11-2: Desire for Death, Suicidal Ideation, and Interest in Physician-assisted Suicide in Palliative Cancer Care, K. Wilson

*Evaluating and Managing Risk for Suicide in Patients Receiving Cancer Therapy, A. Roth


*Abstract added after the printing of the abstract book and program 

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:40am

S12: Health Related Quality of Life and Survivorship: A Tri-Country Examination of Chinese Breast Cancer Survivors in Hong Kong, Los Angeles and Sydney
Global migration has led to growing ethnic and cultural diversity in developed countries. Chinese immigrants are the largest Asian immigrant group in Australia and the US. Despite lower breast cancer (BC) rates in their country of origin, BC incidence among Chinese migrants is similar to those in the general population of their naturalized or adopted home. Additionally, among Chinese migrants BC is the most common cancer accounting for the greatest number of cancer deaths. Chinese migrant breast cancer survivors (BCS) have documented poorer cancer outcomes. We explored patient reported HRQOL and survivorship outcomes in a Tri-Country examination of Chinese BCS in Los Angeles (N=73), Sydney (N=130 Chinese and 185 Anglo-Australians) and Hong Kong (N=371).

Chair: Kimlin Ashing
Discussant: Richard Fielding

S12-1: A Prospective Study of Health-Related Quality of Life among Chinese-American Breast Cancer Survivors, K. Ashing

S12-2: Having Cancer in a Country Not Your Own: The Chinese Immigrant Story in Australia, P. Butow

S12-3: Cancer Survivorship: Chinese Women in Hong Kong, W. Lam




Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:40am

S13: Elevating the Patient Voice: Innovative Strategies for Improving Patient-centered Care Through Qualitative and Quantitative Systems of Reporting Patient Experiences
The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2001) identified the delivery of patient-centered care (PCC) essential in improving overall care in the United States. Today, patient-centered care is even more relevant in light of advances in personalized medicine.  Yet, in order to deliver personalized medicine it is critical that we develop methods and tools that accurately and meaningfully capture the patient experience. The purpose of this symposium is to highlight research initiatives designed to more accurately capture patient experience. The symposium will feature three research initiatives: 1) a patient-centered approach for understanding patient appraisals of quality of life (QOL) and how this approach will be used to develop more focused, concise QOL tools; 2) an international initiative for the systematic analysis of patient narratives;  and 3) a community-initiated approach to patient engagement through the Cancer Experience Registry as a tool to capture patient voice during the course of treatment and its implications for informing new research, policy and clinical care. These research initiatives will be discussed with respect to the challenges and opportunities for integrating data across systems and through diverse strategies of patient engagement to enhance care and accelerate discovery.

Chair: Joanne Buzaglo
Discussant: Kevin Stein

S13-1: Understanding Patient Experiences to Inform Treatment Decision-making: Implications for the use of a Patient-powered Registry, J. Buzaglo

S13-2: A Database of Patient Experience: Moving Beyond Anecdote, N. Pandhi

S13-3: Including the Patient's Perspectives in Patient-reported Outcomes: Assessment of Quality of Life Appraisal in Bladder Cancer, B. Rapkin

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

12:10pm

IPOS CARE Special Interest Group Meeting

CARE (Cancer and Aging: Reflections for Elders) SIG welcomes everyone who is interested in research or clinical activities involving older cancer patients, survivors, and their family members to a meeting on July 31th, Friday, 12:10 – 1:40 pm. We will exchange tips and resources to improve clinical practices to enhance the quality of life and discuss opportunities for research collaboration nationally and internationally. We will also update progress of our projects discussed last year and discuss new directions and activities.


Friday July 31, 2015 12:10pm - 12:40pm
Mount Vernon Square Meeting Level 3

12:10pm

12:10pm

IPOS Federation Meeting
Friday July 31, 2015 12:10pm - 1:40pm
Chinatown Meeting Level 3

12:30pm

IPOS Mentoring Lunch - Separate Registration Required

The IPOS Early Career Professionals Committee warmly invites IPOS 2015 Congress attendees who are starting their careers in psycho-oncology to attend a mentoring luncheon in the Shaw room. Students and early career professionals who are within 10 years of completing their highest degree are eligible. 

This will be a great opportunity for focused mentorship during the Congress, as internationally renowned leaders in psycho-oncology will provide mentorship to small groups of early career professionals. 

Please register before 1st July 2015

To make sure that all groups remain small, registrations will be strictly limited and allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. You must be registered to attend the 2015 World Congress to be eligible for this event. NB: Please select only ONE mentor when registering.

If you have any questions, please contact Claire Wakefield (c.wakefield@unsw.edu.au) of the IPOS Early Career Psycho-oncology Professionals (ECPP) committee.

 


Friday July 31, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Shaw Meeting Level 3

12:30pm

IPOS Website Committee Meeting
Friday July 31, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

12:40pm

APOS Annual Business Meeting - All Attendees are Welcome!
Join the APOS President and Board of Directors for the Annual Business Meeting of Members, held during the World Congress lunch break on Friday, 31 July 2015.

Friday July 31, 2015 12:40pm - 1:40pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

1:40pm

IPOS and APOS Awards and Lectures by Distinguished Leaders in Psychosocial Care
Presentation of IPOS Awards: Sutherland, Fox, Fisman and Kawano.
Presentation of APOS Awards: Holland, Distinguished Public Service, Outstanding Clinical Care, Outstanding Training and Education, and New Investigator Awards.


The IPOS/APOS Awards plenary is generously supported by Genentech. 


Friday July 31, 2015 1:40pm - 3:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:10pm

3:50pm

M: Cancer Survivorship
M-1: Employment Transitions Among Cancer Survivors: A Longitudinal Qualitative Exploration of the Meaning and Performance of Work Following Cancer Treatment, E. Grunfeld

M-2: Work Functioning in Cancer Patients: The Role of Social Support at Home and at Work, U. Bültmann

M-3: Changes in Working Status and Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Cohort Study, E. Choi

M-4:  Lost in Transition: Impact of Living Environment on Surveillance Behaviors and Psychological Health During Survivorship, D. Kang

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

3:50pm

N: Distress and Quality of Life
N-1: Exploring the Individual Patterns of Spiritual Well-being in Relation to Quality of Life Outcomes in People Newly Diagnosed with Advanced Cancer: A Cluster Analysis, M. Bai

N-2: Psychological Distress and Locally-Advanced Prostate Cancer, L. Zajdleiwcz

N-3: The Art of Adjustment: Assessment of Personal Goals after Cancer Diagnosis, A. Ranchor

N-4: Analysis of Pain Characteristics and Prognostic Factors for Pain Management in 152 Lung Cancer Patients with Moderate or Severe Chronic Pain, W. Nanya

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:50pm

O: Psychosocial and Other Interventions
O-1: Evaluations of Written Self-administered Psychosocial Interventions to Improve Psychosocial and Physical Outcomes Among Adults with Chronic Health Conditions: A Aeta-analysis, S. Lambert

O-2: One-year Follow-up of the Outcome of a Home-based Symptom Management Program for Patients Receiving Adjuvant Cancer Therapy, K. Cheng

O-3: Delivering the Cancer and Aging: Reflections for Elders (CARE) Psychosocial Intervention Through Expressive Writing: A Pilot Study, C.Nelson

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 14

3:50pm

P: Screening for Distress and Unmet Needs #2
P-2: Successful Development and Implementation of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center Comprehensive Wellbeing Screening Program, V. Cardenas

P-3: Use of the NCCN Distress Thermometer and Emotional Problem List in Predicting Psychiatric Symptoms, R. Lynn

P-4: Screening for Distress and Services Needs in Patients Beginning Radiation Therapy, D. Wolcott 

*P-1 has been withdrawn from the program 

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:50pm

S14: The Costs of Caring: Grief in the Oncology Context
Patients’ deaths often have profound and lasting impact, deeply affecting not only their loved ones, but also their healthcare providers.  There is a compelling need to better understand how we can best support those impacted by loss in cancer settings.  This symposium will feature four international speakers whose research focuses on grief and loss. The first presentation will describe findings from a survey of palliative care services in 25 countries conducted by the European Association for Palliative Care Bereavement Task Force that examined the types of bereavement care offered.  The second presentation will describe a model of hospital-based transitional support to assist bereaved families of pediatric cancer patients. The final presentation will focus on the impact of patient loss on providers, focusing on a mixed methods study of the grief experienced by pediatric oncologists.  The symposium will conclude with a discussion about the implications of these studies for advancing bereavement research and for care of our patients, our colleagues, and ourselves.

Chair: Wendy Lichtenthal
Discussant: David Kissane

S14-1: Bereavement Services in European Palliative Care: A Descriptive Study by the Bereavement Taskforce of the European Association for Palliative Care, M. Guldin

S14-2: Transitional Social Support: A Developing Framework for Hospital-based Bereavement Care Following the Death of a Child from Cancer, L. Donovan

S14-4: Delivering Bereavement Support Using Telemental Health: Preliminary Findings from an Open Trial of  Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy Delivered through Videoconferencing, W. Lichtenthal 

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:50pm

S15: Shades of Survivorship: Opportunities and Challenges in the Rapidly Increasingly Diverse Oncology Population
Minority groups in the US can be classified into four major ethnic groups American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian Americans, African Americans and Latino-Americans.  U.S. minority groups approaches 40% of the overall population, and about 25% of the cancer survivor population. U.S. minority groups are among the fastest growing segments of the general population and among those affected by cancer. Their rapidly increasing representation warrants further research investigating and addressing health related quality of life and survivorship outcomes.  

Chair: Kimlin Ashing
Discussant: Marjorie Kagawa-Singer

S15-1: The Integrated Cancer Care Access Network (ICCAN) Addressing Social and Economic Barriers to Receipt of Optimal Cancer Care Among Underserved Immigrant and Other Minorities in New York City, F. Gany

S15-2: Developing a Clinically, Linguistically and Culturally Relevant Survivorship Care Plan, K. Ashing

S15-3: Ethnic Variations in Physical Symptoms Explained by Different Follow-up Care Communication and Socioeconomic Wellbeing Between Chinese and Caucasian Breast Cancer Survivors, J. Wang

S15-4: Where is the Science of Culture in Cross-Cultural Cancer Survivorship? Native American Cancer Education for Survivors: Using Technology for Greater Reach and Benefit, L. Burhansstipanov

S15-5: Where is the Science of Culture in Cross-cultural Cancer Survivorship, M. Kagawa-Singer



Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:50pm

S16: Disseminating Evidence-based Cancer Supportive Care Interventions: A National and International Imperative
Despite the emergence of clinical guidelines and quality care standards for psychosocial oncology in some parts of the world, the development and implementation of evidence-based interventions to further this field has proven to be a major global challenge. Leading psychosocial experts have developed internationally recognized training programs to overcome key barriers in disseminating evidence-based treatment strategies and in building programs to deliver high quality supportive care to people affected by cancer. This symposia is designed to educate a multidisciplinary global audience about systematic methods for translating evidence into clinical behaviors that enhance performance outcomes of oncology healthcare professionals. Data from three unique federally funded training programs will be described. The first presentation will review findings from a practical skills-based professional education program designed to teach healthcare professionals how to build, implement, and evaluate supportive care programs. The second presentation will discuss implementation of a comprehensive biopsychosocial screening program, and will include the perspective from a trainee who will identify how the program has influenced cancer care within Brazil. The final presentation will review findings from Cancer2Health, a training program designed to disseminate an empirically-supported biobehavioral intervention for helping newly diagnosed patients cope with cancer stress.

Chair/Discussant: Michelle C Fingeret

S16-1: Dissemination and Implementation (DI) of a Biobehavioral Intervention, B. Andersen

S16-2: Disseminating Methods for Implementing Comprehensive Biopsychosocial Screening: A National and International Perspective, K. Clark

S16-3: From Theory to Practice: Disseminating What We Know to What We Actually Do, M. Loscalzo


Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:50pm

S17: APA Division 54 Hematology/Oncology/BMT SIG: Models of Care in Pediatric Psycho-Oncology
This symposium represents collaboration amongst the Hematology/Oncology/Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Special Interest Group of the Society of Pediatric Psychology, American Psychological Association. Currently, there are no best practice guidelines for the provision of psychosocial care for pediatric cancer patients and their families. Therefore, the objective is to describe psychosocial service models across five institutions of varying sizes, resources, and geographical diversity to aid in our understanding of current practices.

Chair: Jennifer Hoag
Discussant: Kristin Bingen

S17-1: The Psychosocial Services Program of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Cancer Center: Translating Research into Practice, L. Barakat

S17-2: Pediatric Psychosocial Care in Oncology, A. Steele

S17-3: Promoting Positive Adjustment for Sibling Donors of Bone Marrow: A Psychosocial Model of Care at a Single Institution, N. Gupta

S17-4: Model of Care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital (NCH), S. Flowers

S17-5: Standard of Psychosocial Care for Pediatric BMT/HSCT Admissions, K. Kullgren 


Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

6:00pm

Outside the Wire Performance - Limited to first 100 attendees
Limited Capacity seats available

New York-based Outside the Wire theater company, featuring Zach Grenier (of "The Good Wife”, “Deadwood”, and “Fight Club”) in the role of Philoctetes, will perform excerpts from a Greek tragedy by Sophocles that addresses pain, transference, betrayal, confrontation – ancient issues that still resonate in the modern world. Performance includes reflection on the performance by invited panelists and audience participation.

About Theatre of War: Philoctetes
Theater of War: Philoctetes is an innovative project that presents readings of Sophocles’ Philoctetes as a catalyst for town hall discussions about chronic illness and suffering as it touches patients, families, caregivers, and health professionals. This unique, participatory event is intended to promote healthy discussion among diverse communities - public and professional - fostering compassion, cooperation, and understanding. The project is also a teaching tool used by medical institutions, such as: Harvard Medical School, the Mayo Clinic, Weill Cornell Medical College, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

About the Play
Sophocles’ Philoctetes tells the story of decorated warrior who is abandoned on a deserted island because of mysterious chronic illness that he contracts on the way to the Trojan War. Nine years later, the Greeks learn from an oracle that in order to win the war they must rescue him from island. When they finally come for him, the wounded warrior must overcome nine long years of festering resentment and shame in order to accept help from the very men who betrayed him.  

Outside the Wire
Outside the Wire is a social impact company that uses theater and a variety of other media to help communities address pressing public health and social issues, such as combat-related psychological injury, suicide, end of life care, prison reform, political violence and torture, natural and manmade disasters, domestic violence, alcohol/substance abuse and addiction. For more information about all of our projects, please visit: www.outsidethewirellc.com


Sponsored by Hope and Cope.



Friday July 31, 2015 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4
 
Saturday, August 1
 

7:00am

APOS Health Disparities Special Interest Group Meeting

APOS Health Disparities Special Interest Group welcomes conference attendees. Our group is concerned with the disparate cancer outcomes experienced by ethnic and linguistic minorities, indigenous/native peoples, and other underserved populations. We invite you to join our meeting to discuss health inequities and strategies to bring health equity.

We look forward to you sharing your ideas towards:
1) Advancing health equity science, practice and policies relevant to psychosocial oncology;
2) APOS/IPOS contributions and efforts in remedying the undue cancer burden borne by vulnerable communities.


Saturday August 1, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Shaw Meeting Level 3

7:00am

APOS Research Committee Meeting

The APOS Research Committee will be meeting to plan activities and an agenda for the upcoming year. Anyone interested in joining the Research Committee is welcome to attend and participate in the planning meeting.


Saturday August 1, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Judiciary Square Meeting Level 3

7:00am

Wellness Session: Zentangle - Separate Registration Required
Zentangle is a method of meditation based on drawing repetitive patterns to form complex images. Zentangle is a process of combining simple deliberate lines to form beautiful and surprising patterns. Those engaged in Zentangle drawing describe feelings of timelessness, focus and well-being. Even if you are certain that you “cannot draw a straight line” come join us during this Wellness Session to experience the meditative joy that can be found in Zentangle. Zentangle drawing is the first lesson in the workshop, Vacation from Cancer, developed by Susan Silk, MS, who will teach conference participants about Zentangle. Supplies will be provided.

Saturday August 1, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Capitol/Congress (Meeting Level 4)

7:30am

8:00am

Exhibition Hours
Saturday August 1, 2015 8:00am - 12:00pm
Marquis Ballroom Meeting Level 2

8:30am

Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Practice

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is an umbrella term covering a range of subjective reports patients make regarding health, disease, or treatment, generally via structured validated questionnaires.  In addition to outcomes such as distress, PROs include functional status, well-being, symptoms, health-related quality of life, and so on.  PROs can be used in a number of ways to promote the patient-centeredness and improve the quality of care.  In this session, a panel will highlight a number of tools developed to facilitate the use of PROs in clinical practice.  These tools include the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), a User's Guide for implementing PROs in clinical practice, standards for reporting the results of randomized clinical trials that included PRO endpoints, and a Reader's Guide to the PRO literature directed at clinicians who may be unfamiliar with PROs.  This session will provide an overview of the tools and then demonstrate examples of their application in practice.


Speakers:

Claire Snyder, MHS, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University Hospital,USA

Bryce Reeve, PhD
UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health,USA

Jolie Ringash, MD, MSc FRCPC
Princess Margaret Hospital, Canada 

Prof. Irma Verdonck-de Leeuw, PhD 
Professor of Clinical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands  


This plenary is generously supported by Amgen. 


Saturday August 1, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:00am

10:30am

Q: Adolescents and Young Adults
Q-1: Upbringing, Adult Attachment, and Romantic Relationships in Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors and Healthy Controls, V. Lehmann

Q-2: Improving the Quality of Psychosocial Care for Young Adults in Medical Oncology, P. Souza

Q-3: Long-term Adolescent and Young adult Lymphoma Survivors Score Clinically Relevant Lower on Social, Role and Cognitive Quality of Life Domains Later in Life, O. Husson

Q-4: Autobiographical Disruption and Mechanisms of Distress Among Young Adults with Cancer: Implications for Tailoring Evidence-Based Support, U. Sansom-Daly
 

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

10:30am

R: Communication/Information Needs
R-1: Cancer Disclosure in Romania: Trends and Risks - Translation "From Power to Person" , C. Dégi

R-2:  Providers’ Roles for Advancing End of Life Care Discussions: An Emphasis on Support Staff, F. Nedjat-Haiem

R-3: Health Information Needs of Chinese Patients Diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer: A Longitudinal Study, W. Lam

R-4: The Information Need Discordance Between Cancer Patients and Caregivers in China, T-Yi  

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:30am

S18: Coping with Aging and Cancer: Psychosocial Factors and Geriatric-specific Interventions
The “silver tsunami” is the new term for the looming crisis in cancer care related to the increase in elders worldwide—in whom cancer has its highest incidence and for whom there are often fewest psychosocial resources. This symposium addresses age-specific psychological issues related to coping with cancer at an older age by Dr. Greenstein. The impact of social  and religious beliefs on cancer  care of elders will be discussed by Dr. Baider with attention to the customs in the Muslim culture.  Two geriatric-specific psychosocial interventions developed by the Memorial team will be presented by Dr Holland: The CARE  (Cancer and Aging: Reflections of Elders) Model, deliverable by phone, and a novel reading group, the Vintage Readers Book Club, in which elders read and discuss excerpts from the world's classical literature. Discussants are Dr. Chambers, Australia and Dr. Asuzu, Nigeria.

Chair: Jimmie Holland
Discussant: Suzanne Chambers and Chioma Asuzu

S18-1:  Psychosocial Similarities Between Coping with Cancer and Aging, M.Greenstein

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:30am

S19: Opportunities and Challenges of Promoting Tobacco Cessation among Cancer Patients: Expanding the Toolkit of the Psycho-Oncologist
Smoking remains the leading cause of cancer associated with at least twelve different cancer diagnoses. Continued smoking is associated with numerous adverse clinical outcomes for cancer patients and survivors including increased risk for treatment complications, disease recurrence, second primary cancers, other tobacco-related chronic medical conditions, poor quality of life, psychosocial distress and death. Tobacco dependent cancer patients are more likely to suffer from comorbid depression, anxiety, insomnia, poor pain control and social stigma. Fortunately, evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological treatment exists; however, adequate training of psycho-oncologists and integration of tobacco treatment in routine cancer care remains subpar. Historically, psycho-oncologists have paid little attention to the clinical problem of continued tobacco use. The proposed research-to-practice symposium will provide a compelling clinical rationale for expanding the role of psycho-oncologists into the treatment of tobacco dependence among cancer patients, summarize tools for standardized assessment of tobacco use, identify the prevalence, patterns and predictors of continued smoking, dispel myths about smoking as an effective form of coping for cancer patients, summarize behavioral counseling techniques for motivating and maintaining smoking cessation, reducing the stigma of reporting smoking and seeking tobacco treatment, discuss patient, provider and systems level barriers and provide practical models for integration of smoking cessation treatment into routine cancer care. Based on their collective scientist-clinician expertise, the presenters will provide a blueprint for developing tobacco treatment services, providing consultation and liaison to medical care providers who treat tobacco dependent cancer patients and delivering evidence-based tobacco treatment in an empathic, supportive and non-judgmental manner.

Chair: Jamie Ostroff
Discussant: Stephanie Land

S19-1: Incorporating Evidence-based Smoking Cessation into Community Oncology Practices: Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an Enhanced Quitline-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention for Cancer Survivors, K. Weaver

S19-2: Smoking Relapse Prevention Intervention for Cancer Patients, V. Simmons

S19-3: Integrating Tobacco Treatment into Cancer Care: Details of Implementation, E. Park   

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:30am

S20: The Unspoken Need: Developing Standards and Guidelines for Training Supervisors in Psycho-oncology
Supervision in psycho-oncology is a complex endeavor as supervisees need training in flexibility, patience, critical thinking, consultation, relationship-building, and communication with interprofessional teams, as well as ample room to explore their emotional reactions to working with cancer patients. Given such challenging and specific requirements, this symposium aims to clarify how we may best train supervisors within the field of psycho-oncology. It will be composed of three related discussions with a concluding case study to illuminate key issues. An overview of the limited international literature and results from an online survey will be incorporated into the presentations.

The first part of this symposium will focus on the unique features of supervising in psycho-oncology. There has been a recent call for psychology trainees to learn more about the biological factors in behavioral health and to put the “bio” back in the biopsychosocial model (Larkin, 2014).  Thus supervisees need to learn about the types of medical treatment that their patients receive, and to understand the roles of other professionals, and basic medical terminology.  Furthermore, supervisees require specific skill-training such as differentiating the effects of medical treatment from the symptoms of mood disorders, addressing existential concerns, working with family systems and on recognizing common countertransference responses.

The second part will focus on the training needs and basic competencies of supervisors. Topics include how to educate supervisees on working with an interdisciplinary team, conveying adequate medical information without being overwhelming, maintaining attention to supervisee’s emotional response to the work, how to facilitate supervisee’s awareness of how they as a therapist may avoid certain issues with a cancer patient (e.g. fear of recurrence) and how they may be more active than reflective in the face of illness.

The third part will discuss the recent shifts in the United States in the last decade to conceptualize clinical supervision as a professional competency for therapists.  The implications of the American Psychological Association Guidelines for Clinical Supervision in Health Service Psychology will be discussed with an emphasis on its metatheoretical approach of competency-based supervision and seven domains of supervision. The discussion will focus on how competency-based supervision is relevant to training students in psycho-oncology, and how it will likely influence the development of standards for training supervisors.

We will close the symposium with a supervision clinical case study focused on integrating the three different supervisor roles of counseling, consulting, and educating in a bone marrow transplant setting.

Chair: Mark Moore
Discussant: Nicole Taylor

S20-1: A Lack of Training for the Supervisor: Supervisee-focused Supervision in Psychosocial Oncology, N. Taylor

S20-2: Wearing the Tri-cornered Hat: A Supervision Case Study, N. Taylor

S20-3: Setting Goals in Supervision: Clarifying What Psycho-oncology Supervisees Need to Know and Experience, M. Moore

S20-4: Perceived Importance of Psycho-Oncology Clinical Guidelines for Chinese Cancer Patients and Health Professionals, L. Tang

S20-5: Competency-based Clinical Supervision: New Developments in the United States, A. Kracen
  

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:30am

S: End of Life Care
S-1: Searching the Globe: End of Life Beliefs and Practices among Indigenous Women in Northeast India, I. Carrion

S-2: Good Death in Cancer Care in China: A Qualitative Study, L. Song

S-4: Managing the Bureaucracy of Dying: A Qualitative Study of Lay Caregivers as Care Coordinators for Cancer Patients Dying in the Home, S. Mohammed 

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:30am

T: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation #1
T-1: Social Support Improves Sleep Quality Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, S. Viozat

T-2: Cancer and Treatment Distress Measurement over Time in a Multicenter Cohort of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT) Recipients (BMT CTN 0902), K. Syrjala

T-3: Psychological and Physical Functioning in Caregivers Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Z. Luo

T-4: One Year After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Study of Couples' Experiences, D. Petricone-Westwood

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:30am

U: Psychosocial Interventions for Women with Breast Cancer #1
U-1: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management in Breast Cancer: Survival and Recurrence at 11-year Follow-up, J. Stagl

U-2: Does a Peer-Led Exercise Intervention Affect Sedentary Behavior Among Breast Cancer Survivors?, B. Pinto

U-3: A Pilot Study of Subjective Cognitive Functioning Following the Mobile Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Breast Cancer(mMBSR(BC)) Survivors Program, C. Lengacher

U-4:  Are There Patients who Benefit Less From A Self-administered Cognitive-behavioral Therapy  for Cancer-related Insomnia?, J. Savard

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 15

12:00pm

12:00pm

Exhibit Move-Out
Saturday August 1, 2015 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Marquis Ballroom Meeting Level 2

12:20pm

Patient Advocacy: Consumers & Advocates - Adding the 'Rock & Roll' to the practice of Contemporary Psycho-Oncology (Lunch Plenary)

This session will demonstrate the critical role consumer advocates play in shaping the research and practice agenda for real world solutions to improve the quality of life for people diagnosed with cancer and their families. Increasingly, the practice of psycho-oncology is dogged by complex narrative, methodological disputes, and statistical skirmishing. Questions about relevance are key in an environment craving innovative yet efficacious answers to seemingly intractable problems. A series of three case studies will be presented, each bringing together a consumer advocate and psycho-oncology researcher or health professional. Each pair will describe their experience in working collaboratively to define and then subsequently address a problem, with a particular emphasis on outcomes. Finally each pair will summarise a “call to arms” for congress participants with a list of three tips or essential actions for meaningful impacts.

To close the session, the Chair will summarise the key points and facilitate a panel discussion with the audience.

Chair: 
Prof. Jeff Dunn, PhD, AO
Chief Executive Officer, Cancer Council Queensland, Australia

Speakers: 
Prof. Gary L. Kreps, Ph.D., FAAHB
University Distinguished Professor, Department of Communication Director, George Mason University, USA 

Prof. Nur Aishah Mohd Taib
Professor, Consultant Breast Surgeon, University of Malaya, Malaysia

Paula Kim
Chief Executive Officer, Translating Research Across Communities (TRAC),USA 

Ranjit Kaur Pritam Singh
Chairman, NCD Alliance Malaysia and Chairman, Together Against Cancer Malaysia

Prof. Suzanne Chambers
Professor of Preventative Health, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Australia

Peter Dornan, AM
Convenor, Brisbane Prostate Cancer Support Network, Australia 


Saturday August 1, 2015 12:20pm - 1:50pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

1:50pm

2:10pm

Making the Case For Psychosocial Health in Cancer Care: Global Barriers and Opportunities

The field of psychosocial oncology, with decades of research around improved clinical outcomes and increasing recognition as part of the standard of care, remains challenged to demonstrate its full impact in cancer care. What’s missing in our research, our practice and policies that will substantiate the value of psychosocial care? How can we better make the case for the integration of psychosocial care to healthcare providers and administrators, to patients and families, to payers and policymakers? What can we learn from other countries that we can apply in our own communities? Is there a universal need that we all share and can commit to as a global movement in quality cancer care? 

MODERATOR: Susan Dentzer is the senior policy adviser for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She was the editor-in-chief of the journal Health Affairs. She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and the Council on Foreign Relations. She is a former health correspondent for the News Hour with Jim Lehrer and correspondent and columnist for U.S. News & World Report and Newsweek. 

(PSYCHIATRY) David Kissane, MD is an academic psychiatrist, psycho-oncology researcher and author. He is currently the Head of Psychiatry for Monash University in Australia, recently the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. His academic interests include group, couples and family psychotherapy trials, communication skills training, studies of existential distress, and the ethics of end-of-life care. He is best known for his model of family therapy delivered to ‘at risk’ families during palliative care, which prevents complicated grief and depression in bereavement. 

(PEDIATRICS/NETHERLANDS) Martha Grootenhuis, Ph.D is Head Research and Co-Director of the Pediatric Psychology Department of the Emma Children’s Hospital Amsterdam. Her research is on pediatric psychology (children with chronic diseases) and pediatric psychosocial oncology in particular. She is involved in the evaluation and implementation of innovative (ehealth) interventions for children and parents. In 2007 she founded the Pediatric Psycho-Oncology committee with SIOP (SIOP-PPO). 

(PSYCHOLOGY) Paul Jacobsen, PhD is currently the Associate Center Director for Population Science, Dr. Jacobsen was recruited to the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa Florida in 1994 to direct the Center’s clinical and research programs in psychosocial oncology. He was among the first investigators to describe how and why many patients continue to experience problems in quality of life long after they have completed cancer treatment.  He has also been a pioneer in developing and evaluating strategies, now widely disseminated, that patients can use to better deal with the stress of being diagnosed and treated for cancer. Recently, he has focused his efforts on increasing the availability of psychosocial care for people with cancer nationally and internationally through his work with the ASCO, IPOS and several other major professional organizations. 

(ONCOLOGY SOCIAL WORK/ADVOCACY) Vicki Kennedy, LCSW is Vice President, Program Development & Delivery for the Cancer Support Community (CSC) global organization in Washington, DC. An oncology social worker for the past 32 years, Ms. Kennedy is responsible for development, delivery and quality assurance of CSC community-based psychosocial programs worldwide.  Ms. Kennedy formerly served as Co-Founder/CEO of The Wellness Community-Central Indiana; psycho-oncology researcher at the Walther Cancer Institute in Indianapolis; and staff social worker of the IU Cancer Center in bone marrow transplant/hematology. She is a past-president of the Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) and an APOS board member. Ms. Kennedy is leading the dissemination of distress screening and treatment decision support counseling across CSC and cancer centers as well as participating in cost-effectiveness of psychosocial care research. 

(POLICY/HEALTH CARE) Clifford Goodman, PhD is a Senior Vice President at The Lewin Group, a health care policy and human services consulting firm located near Washington, D.C. He has 30 years of experience in health care evaluation, including HTA, evidence-based health care, comparative effectiveness research (CER), health economics, and studies pertaining to health care innovation, regulation and payment. He directs studies and projects for an international range of government agencies; pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies; health care provider institutions; and professional, industry and patient advocacy groups. His recent work has involved such areas as oncology, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, end-stage renal disease, biosimilars, and personalized medicine. He serves on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care and the American Journal of Managed Care. 

 

This plenary is generously supported by the Cancer Support Community with a grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb.



Saturday August 1, 2015 2:10pm - 3:40pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:45pm

AA: Quality of Life and Well-Being
AA-1: Examination of Construct Validity of the Brief Resilience Scale in a Mixed Cancer Group, B. Dixon

AA-2: Symptom Burden and Unmet Needs Mediators of Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis, K. Cheng

AA-3: The Mediating Role of Self-Compassion in the Relationship Between Adult Attachment Styles & Psychological Distress Among Oncology Patients, L.Kinsella

AA-4: Positive and Negative Life Changes and Psychological Distress in Survivors of Testicular Cancer, S. Vehling 

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:45pm

S21: Online Psychological Therapeutic Interventions for People Affected by Cancer
Access to appropriate psychological therapy can be problematic for individuals diagnosed with cancer and their partners, due to a range of barriers including lack of availability, distance, illness, cost and stigma1-3.  In response to these challenges and the recognised need to increase cancer patients’ and partners’ access to psychosocial care, recent psycho-oncology therapeutic interventions have aimed to emulate other areas of health care3, 4 by providing online therapeutic programs as an alternative or adjunct to conventional therapist-administered face-to-face psychosocial interventions.  This symposium aims to present an updated picture of emerging research examining the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of delivering online psychological interventions to individuals diagnosed with cancer and their partners.  Presentations will explore difficulties and benefits of delivering such interventions by reporting on five separate online psychological interventions aimed at different patient groups. 

Chair: Lisa Beatty
Discussant: Haryana Dhillon

S21-1: Finding My Way: Uptake and Satisfaction with an Internet Self-help Program for Cancer-related Distress, L. Beatty

S21-2: The Impact of an Online Psychological Support Program for Men with Prostate Cancer on Sexual Satisfaction: RCT Results from My Road Ahead, A. Wootten

S21-3: Feasibility and Pilot Testing of an Online Psychological Support Intervention for Partners of Men with Prostate Cancer, A. Wootten

S21-4: Improving Reach and Uptake of Psychosexual Support: Introducing Rekindle, a Web-based Psychosexual Resource for All Cancer Survivors and Their Partners, C. Lawsin

S21-5: e-TC: Development and Pilot Testing of an Online Psychosocial Intervention to Reduce Anxiety and Depression in Testicular Cancer Survivors, A. Smith

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:45pm

S22: Global Psychosocial Standards of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with Cancer: A Review of the Current State of Research and Clinical Care
Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer face significant suffering including anxiety, reduced quality of life, pain and other psychosocial symptoms. Untreated distress and pain in AYAs with cancer predicts long-term psychological late effects, regardless of the outcome of the disease. AYAs with cancer have been understudied and underrepresented in clinical trials. This population faces many short- and long-term health and psychosocial consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment, but many programs for cancer treatment, survivorship care, and psychosocial support do not focus on the specific needs of AYA cancer patients. There is also growing evidence of interventions that can enhance resilience and positive psychological outcomes in AYAs.  During this symposium, leading international AYA experts will present the state of the science in AYA psychosocial care and discuss implications for the clinical setting. 

Chair: Barbara Jones
Discussant: Karen Fasciano

S22-1: Supportive Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer, B. Zebrack 

S22-2: Building Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Theoretical and Patient-Reported Rationale for Positive Psychological Interventions, A. Rosenberg 

S22-3: Assessing and Managing the Distress and Psychosocial Needs of AYA Cancer Patients, P. Patterson

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:45pm

V: Pediatric Cancer
V-1: Attentional Bias Towards Cancer-related Stimuli is Related to Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress in Parents of Children Recently Diagnosed with Cancer, M. Cernvall

V-2: The Effects of Cancer-Related Stress and Perceived Prognosis on Mother-Child Communication about Cancer, M. Keim

V-3: Evaluation of an Electronic Psychosocial Dashboard to Facilitate the Delivery of the Psychosocial Standards of Care in Pediatric Oncology, A. Pai

V-4:  Advances in Pediatric Oncology: A Five-year Nation-wide Survival Follow-up at Children’s Cancer Hospital in Egypt, H.El Malla

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:45pm

W: Adult Cancer Survivors
W-1: Fear of Cancer Recurrence, Quality of Life and Distress in the First Year After the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer, J. Custers

W-2: Trajectories of Quality of Life, Health and Personal Wellbeing in the First Two Years Following Curative Intent Colorectal Cancer: Results from the UK ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) Study, C. Foster

W-3: Autonomy Support and Changes in Self-determined Motivation for Physical Activity Predict Changes in Posttraumatic Growth Among Post-treatment Breast Cancer Survivors, M. McDonough

W-4: Prevalence and Correlates of Physical Activity in Post-Treatment Cancer Survivors, A. Troeschel   

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:45pm

X: Care Delivery and Professional Issues
X-1: Dissemination and Therapists’ Implementation of an Evidence-Based Treatment for Cancer Patients, M. Ryba

X-2: Development of a Resiliency Program for Interpreters in Cancer Care, E. Park

**X-3: LGBTQI Cancer Healthcare Experiences: Results of a Survey of Healthcare Providers and an LGBTQI Population in Florida, G. Quinn 

X-4: Distress in Cancer Survivors Attending a Multidisciplinary Survivorship Clinic, T. Sanft


** X-3 (G.Quinn) will be presented first in this this sesion 

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

3:45pm

Y: Psychosocial Interventions for Women with Breast Cancer #2
Y-1: The Relationship Between Stress Hormones (cortisol), Cytokines (IL-6) and Symptoms among Breast Cancer Survivors(BCS) in an MBSR(BC) Randomized Controlled Trial(RCT),
C. Lengacher 

Y-2:  A Symptom Cluster Trial, the Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR(BC) on Symptom Clusters among Breast Cancer Survivors(BCS), C. Lengacher 

Y-3: Feasibility and Effects of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT) on Psychological Well-Being in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized, Wait List Controlled Pilot Study, K. Weihs

Y-4:  Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Post-Treatment Survivors with Cancer-Related Cognitive Impairment: Results of a Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial, S. Johns

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:45pm

Z: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation #2
Z-1: Stem Cell Transplant Cancer Survivors’ Associations of Personal Resilience Resources with Longitudinal Changes in Distress and Purpose in Life, R. Campo

Z-2: Developing a Risk Prediction Model for Long-term Physical and Psychological Functioning after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, A. Braamse

Z-3: Pre-transplant Health-related Qality of Life Factors as Predictors of Outcomes Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Study from the BMT CTN 0902 Trial, J. Knight

Z-4: Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression Among Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients, A. Nelson

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 14