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Thursday, July 30
 

10:40am

A: Body Image
A-1: Body Image in Irradiated Head and Neck Cancer Patients: The Impact of Surgical Procedures, T. Hung

A-2: A Longitudinal Examination of the Protective Effects of Hope and Optimism on Body Image Distress in a Mixed-cancer Population, R. Mahendran

A-3: Identifying Sociocultural Influences and Psychological Processes that Influence the Body Image of Women with Breast Cancer, H. Lewis-Smith

A-4: A Longitudinal Perspective of Body Image in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Reconstructive Surgery, I. Teo 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:40am

B: Decision Making and Information Provision
B-1: Prostate Cancer Decision-Making: A National Survey on Treatment and Research, D. Monticalvo

B-2: Psychological Distress, Age and Salience of Physical Appearance: Mediator and Moderator Effects of the BRECONDA Web-based Decision Aid for Women Considering Breast Reconstruction Following Mastectomy, K. Sherman

B-3: Use of Perceptual Mapping and Vector Modeling to Develop Message Strategies to Encourage Informed Decision Making for Clinical Trial Participation among African American Cancer Patients, S. Bass

B-4: Group Medical Consultations (GMCs) in Combination with Tablet-based Video GMCs as an Alternative for Individual Breast Cancer Follow-up Visits: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial, A. Visser 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:40am

C: Family, Partner, and Caregiver Issues #1
C-1: ProsCan Partners Study: Predicting Distress and Quality of Life for Partners of Men with Prostate Cancer up to 5 Years After Treatment, M. Hyde

C-2: Cancer Health-Care Professionals Providing Quality Care to Family Caregivers, J. Hanson

C-3: Coping, Optimism, and Quality of Life in Couples Managing Prostate Cancer, L. Song

C-4: Salivary Cortisol as Individual and Dyadic Markers of Stress and Health among Colorectal Cancer Patients and Their Caregivers, Y. Kim 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:40am

D: Pediatric Brain Cancer
D-1: Does Group Social Skills Intervention for Children with Brain Tumors Improve Quality of Life? A Randomized Controlled Trial, M. Barrera

D-2: Differential Effect of Brain Radiation on Social Skills and Quality of Life of Children Affected by Brain Tumors, M. Barrera

D-3: Neurofeedback not Effective in Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors: Results of a Double-blind Randomized Sham-controlled Trial, M. de Ruiter

D-4: Deficits in Executive Functioning and Effortful Control: Explaining Emotional Adjustment in Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors (PBTS), E. Semmel 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 15

10:40am

S1: The Role of Peer Support in Survivorship Care
10:40 (5 mins) Introduction by the Chair/Discussant: Prof Jeff Dunn, AO
Peer support has a long tradition in community based support for people affected by cancer. However this approach has until recently, been largely neglected in research and cancer care guidelines, policy and planning documents.  As the cancer burden increases alongside fiscal constraints, peer support is set to move to prominence as an accessible, effective and affordable model of care.  Understanding and further developing effective and sustainable peer support interventions will be essential if we are to accelerate progress in providing cancer support to those affected across the globe and achieving World Cancer Declaration targets.

10:45 (20 mins) S1-1: Peer Support as a Clinically-sponsored Intervention,Cathy Hirsch, Reach to Recovery International, USA
Cathy’s presentation will discuss the natural tendency of patients facing serious illness to seek emotional support and information from others who experienced similar circumstances, as well as the advantages of providing organized, established peer support programs at the community level.

11:05 (20 mins) S1-2: Maximising Effectiveness in Peer Support: Practical Considerations, Prof Suzanne Chambers, Professor of Preventative Health, Griffith University, AU
Suzanne’s presentation will provide articulation points for researchers seeking to evaluate the impact of peer support in cancer and for designing methodologies underpinned by theory that match how peer support is expressed and consumed.

11:25 (20 mins) S1-3: Putting Peer Support Online: The Importance of Internet Literacy, Dr Stephen Lepore, Professor of Public Health and Director of Social and Behavioral Health Interventions Laboratory, Temple University, USA
Stephen will present data from an online breast cancer support intervention which shows a positive relationship between internet literacy and improvements in symptoms of depression and anxiety.   

11:45 (20 mins) S1-4: The Role of Peer Support for Physical Well-Being after Cancer, Dr Kevin Stein, American Cancer Society, US
Kevin’s presentation will focus on understanding how physical activity can improve overall physical health and the use of peer mentors/coaches and online peer support programs.  

12:05 (20 mins) Closing Comments by Symposium Chair 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:40am

S2: Cancer-focused Assessment, Decision Aids, and Support Using Web-based Systems
The use of technology has been growing rapidly in the field of psycho-oncology.  Numerous eHealth options are being created, evaluated and utilized, including those for assessment, decision aids, treatment and the provision of support.  This session will highlight a number of eHealth programs across these areas from around the world.  Dr. Tania Estapé, from Spain, will chair this session and present data on online psychological assessment in cancer patients and arguments to analyze "online" profiles.  Dr. Leslie Schover, from the US, will present on her intervention for cancer-related male sexual problems.  Dr. Addie Wootten, from Australia, will focus on a prostate cancer portal her team created and highlight issues of uptake, barriers, and stigma.  Dr. Claire Foster, from the UK, will present on web based decision aids to support young women diagnosed with breast cancer.  Dr. Lee Ritterband, Professor and Director of the Behavioral Health and Technology Laboratory at the University of Virginia, will be discussant, and provide an overview to the current state of the field and what the future may hold.

Chair: Tania Estapé
Discussant: Lee M. Ritterband

S2-1: Developing an Internet-Based Intervention for Cancer-Related Male Sexual Problems, L. Schover
S2-2: Using Web-enabled Technology to Support Men with Prostate Cancer: PROSTMATE, A. Wootten
S2-3: Psychological Assessment Via Internet, T.Estapé
S2-4: Web-based Decision Aids to Support Young Women with Breast Cancer, C, Foster
 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:40am

S3: Psychosocial Distress Screening in the Community Cancer Setting: Creating a Real-time Resource for Community-Based Providers
The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) enlisted the American Psychological Association (APOS) to assist in a project to identify model programs for distress screening of cancer patients among ACCC sites. The ACCC has 680 cancer program members and has a stated purpose of being the leading education and advocacy organization for the multidisciplinary cancer team. The goal of the project was to identify 3 model programs that could serve as resources to other ACCC programs with regard to screening.

Chair: Teresa Deshields
Discussant: Mark Lazenby

S3-1: ACCC's Overview of Psychosocial Distress Screening in the Community Cancer Setting, M. Gandee
S3-2: What Can We Learn from Model Programs for Distress Screening?, T. Deshields
S3-3: Distress Screening from Paper/Pencil to EHR Integration, J. Kendall
S3-4: What Does an Optimal Model for Distress Screening Look Like?  Developing Selection Criteria to Determine Best Practice, L. Padgett

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:40am

S4: Psychological Reactions to Recurrent and Metastatic Cancer: A New Challenge in Cancer Survivorship
Response to the diagnosis of recurrent or metastatic disease is qualitatively different for survivors from that associated with initial diagnosis of cancer (Thornton et al., 2014).  Available data suggest that in contrast to initial diagnosis, patients with recurrent/metastatic cancer have lower functional status and report more pain, fatigue and relationship problems (Frost et al., 2000; Northouse et al., 2002; Sarenmalm et al., 2008).  Despite the psychological importance of a diagnosis of recurrence or metastatic disease to the cancer patient, there is little psychosocial research on the subject.
Following introductory remarks, the proposed symposium presents research on depression, social support, and emotion regulation in patients with recurrent/metastatic cancer, ending with outcome data from an intervention trial.  Longitudinal data from diagnosis through one year are presented.  The first presentation will discuss relationships between illness-related disruption of social/recreational activities and depressive symptoms in women with Stage IV breast cancer.  The second presentation will compare the impact of emotion regulation on quality of life in patients with recurrent cancer versus metastatic disease. The third presentation will describe a study of the mechanisms by which social support may be related to physical health outcomes in women with breast cancer recurrence. The final presentation will provide the results of a 20-session mindfulness- and hope-based intervention specifically designed for patients with recurrent cancer.  Together, this research provides a unique picture of socioemotional reactions to recurrent/metastatic cancer, as well as a novel treatment for addressing such reactions and enhancing quality of life.

Chair: Julia Rowland
Discussant: Neil Aaronson

S4-1: Social Support, Health, and Recurrent Breast Cancer: Understanding Psychological and Biological Mechanisms, C. Dorfman
S4-2: The Mediating Effects of Emotion Regulation in Cancer Recurrence, C. Conley
S4-3: Test of Mindfulness and Hope Components in a Psychological Intervention for Women with Cancer Recurrence, B. Andersen
S4-4: Depressive Symptoms, Goal Engagement, and Activity Disruption in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer, A. Stanton 

Thursday July 30, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:50pm

E: Cancer Prevention
E-1: Tailoring Tobacco Cessation Interventions for Special Populations served by Federally Qualified Health Centers, M. Pratt-Chapman

E-2: Managing Women’s Uncertainty during Genetic Counseling Sessions for BRCA Testing, C. Fisher

E-3: Acceptance Patterns and Decision-making for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Canadian Parents: A Stages of Change Model, S. Perez

E-4: Media Representation of the HPV Vaccine: A Content Analysis of Canadian Newspapers, S. Perez

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:50pm

F: Delivery of Psychosocial Care
F-1: Finding My Way: A Mixed-methods Interim Analysis of Predictors of Adherence to an Online Psychological Intervention for Cancer-related Distress, L. Beatty

F-2: Assessing Institutional Capacity to Implement Psychosocial Support Services: The National Cancer Institute Psychosocial Care Matrix, B. Zebrack

F-3: Cancer Patients’ Reasons for Acceptance or Decline of Psychological Intervention: An Interview Study, R. Brebach

F-4: The Psychosocial Matrix: Longitudinal Study of Use within the NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP), L. Padgett 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 14

3:50pm

G: Family, Partner, and Caregiver Issues #2
G-1: Information and Its Impact on Co-survivors of Cancer Patients, D. D'Souza

G-2: Contradictions of Morality in Mother-Daughter Breast Cancer Coping:  A Dialectical Perspective of the “Right” Way to Cope, B. Wolf

G-3: Evaluation of Truce: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Program for Young People who have a Parent with Cancer, P. Patterson

G-4: The Association between Family Caregiver Burden and the Survival of Advanced Cancer Patients, J. Dionne-Odom

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:50pm

H: Sexual and Urinary Function
H-1: Sex and Head and Neck Cancer: The Lived Experience of Survivors, B. Rhoten

H-2: Intimacy and Sexual  Dysfunction in  Bladder Cancer Patients Treated with Cystectomy, M.Grant

H-3: Decrease in Intercourse Satisfaction in Men who Recover Erections after Radical Prostatectomy, C. Benedict

H-4: Effects of Patient-Centered Interventions on Persistent Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Treatment, A. Zhang

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Archives

3:50pm

S5: Research Methods in Supportive Oncology: Highlights from the MGH Workshop
Despite major advances in our understanding of cancer and its treatment, patients with cancer continue to report suffering from the symptoms of fatigue, pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression, and poor appetite. Supportive oncology (i.e., psychosocial oncology, palliative care, symptom management, and survivorship) research and interventions have the potential to alleviate these symptoms and mitigate their ramifications. However, the evidence base for supportive oncology practices is still relatively small, especially in comparison to that for medical oncology. More researchers are needed with the necessary skills for designing, conducting, and analyzing scientifically sound studies in supportive oncology are needed. This symposium provides highlights from the NCI-funded MGH Workshop on Research Methods in Supportive Oncology, an intensive 6-day training experience for early-stage investigators. The talks selected for this symposium address key aspects in planning an intervention study: behavioral theories and conceptual models which guide intervention development; approaches to data analysis; and practical considerations for successful clinical trials. This symposium is geared towards individuals with an interest, but limited experience, in research. After the talks there will be opportunities for attendees to ask questions related to their own research ideas.

Chair/Discussant: William Pirl

S5-1: Developing a Quantitative Analytic Plan that Corresponds to Study Aims and Design, L. Traeger

S5-2: Performing a Successful Supportive Care Clinical Trial, J. Temel 

S5-3: Applications of Behavioral Theory and Conceptual Models in Supportive Oncology Research, J. Greer
 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:50pm

S6: Where Do We Stand with Families? Advancing Family-Centered Care in Cancer and Bereavement
Chair: Talia Zaider
Discussant: Lea Baider

S6-1: Family Cancer Caregivers’ Long-term Adjustment to Bereavement, Y. Kim

S6-2: Outcomes of Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Focused Grief Therapy in Palliative Care and Bereavement, D. Kissane

S6-3: Advancing the Role of Oncology Nurses in Supporting the Family: Results of Family-Focused Training Interventions Piloted in the Acute Care Setting, T. Zaider

S6-4: A Longitudinal Analysis of Widowed Fathers Due to Cancer: 6 and 12 Month Follow-up, J. Yopp

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:50pm

S7: Delivering Psychosocial Care in Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology: Unique International Challenges and Opportunities
Worldwide, pediatric and adolescent/young adult (AYA) cancer affects over 160,000 families each year,1 who experience a complex constellation of psychosocial needs. Despite considerable progress in pediatric/adolescent psycho-oncology, a number of vulnerable populations continue to ‘fall through the cracks’.  For example, emerging research indicates that young children’s distress during cancer treatment may be missed if screening methodologies do not ask the right questions, in the right ways (talk one). Other groups may experience significant psychosocial needs that are unaddressed due to complex developmental factors, and their lack of ‘critical mass’ within treatment-settings, such as AYAs with cancer (talk two). Other sub-groups remain underserviced within pediatric psycho-oncology due to their ‘dislocation’ within the system, such as bereaved parents (talk three) and grandparents of children with cancer (talk four). The unique needs of these groups offer both distinct challenges, and important opportunities, in developing and implementing effective intervention strategies in complex settings. This symposium showcases four innovative studies, each addressing a neglected, underserviced population, and with a focus on translating standards into evidence-based practice.

Addressing recent international consensus that the ‘6th vital sign’ of distress be measured, documented and treated at each clinical contact, Talk one examines the development and validation of an evidence-based tool to quickly and accurately assess a child’s distress, from their own perspective, during cancer treatment. Talk two presents a case-series of ethical and clinical challenges from a large-scale randomized-controlled trial of an online cognitive-behavioural therapy group intervention for AYAs with cancer. The management of these ethical/clinical challenges is discussed with relation to international practice-standards for psychologists in e-mental health. The symposium then turns to the needs of underserviced groups. Talk three presents a multisite study evaluating the impact of different bereavement services/interventions for parents in the aftermath of their child’s cancer. Finally, Talk four focuses on the development, evaluation, and community-based dissemination of a novel intervention to address grandparent’s informational and psychological needs following their grandchild’s cancer diagnosis.

Integrating qualitative and quantitative methodologies, this symposium addresses the impact of cancer across multiple stages of the translational-science research continuum, from important Phase I discovery research (Talks one and three), to Phase II trials evaluating novel interventions (Talks two and four), through to a program of dissemination research evaluating the real-world impact of new models of care and support (Talks three and four).

1.Ferlay J et al.GLOBOCAN 2002: Cancer incidence,mortality and prevalence worldwide.IARC Cancer Base N°5,V.2.0. Lyon, IARC Press. 2004.

Chair: Ursula Sansom-Daly
Discussant: Lori Wiener

S7-1: Translation of Research to Practice for Grandparents of Children with Cancer: National Dissemination and Evaluation of a New Resource, C. Wakefield

S7-2: Recreating Life After Death: The Place of Professional and Social Support In the Lives of Parents Following the Death of a Child From Cancer, L. Donovan

S7-3: Clinical Challenges in Implementing Psychosocial Support in the Online Space: Experiences from the ‘Recapture Life’ Trial, U. Sansom-Daly

S7-4: The Development of a Pediatric Screen: Next Generation Distress Thermometer?, S. Zadeh 

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:50pm

S8: Managing an Increased Risk of Breast Cancer: Stress Reduction and Risk Reducing Surgery Decisions
Women from high risk breast families, with or without a BRCA1/2 mutation, need to manage their risk, yet little is known about how they understand, conceptualise and make decisions about risk. This symposium explores this issue from multiple perspectives, using mixed Australian and US data, and reporting new results from a very large, prospective study of high risk women.

Chair: Phyllis Butow
Discussant: Mary Jane Esplen

S8-1: Risk Perception in Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer: Intuitive Versus Cognitive, P. Butow

**S8-2: Does Stress Cause Cancer? A 15 Year Prospective Study of Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer, P. Butow

S8-3: Factors Associated with the Decision to have Risk Reducing Mastectomy or Oopherectomy, M. Price

S8-4: Prophylactic Mastectomy Decision-Making: What Help do Women Need?, A. Patendaude

**S8-2 will be presented first.



Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:50pm

S9: Early Career Professionals in Psycho-Oncology: Some “How To’s” to Support Career Development
Psycho-oncology is a field that affords significant opportunities for innovation and impact. Early career researchers and clinicians in particular have the potential to contribute innovative ideas as the field continues to grow. The development of well-supported and skilful workforce will help address the vast psychosocial needs of cancer patients, survivors, and family members throughout the world. However, early career professionals in psycho-oncology (ECPPs) are often faced with formidable challenges in establishing their careers and building expertise. This is made more difficult in the absence of clear career pathways for ECPPs, which can leave ECPPs feeling unsupported. In addition to the key issue of limited access to resources, many ECPPs are also managing internal battles regarding disappointment and rejection and feelings of inadequacy. It is evident that ECPPs are in need of support.

Having recognised this need, a group of active and enthusiastic ECPPs, supported by IPOS, formed the IPOS ECPP Committee to promote the needs of early career researchers and clinicians commencing a career in psycho-oncology. The group has representation from Europe, North America, Asia, Africa and Australia. The mandate of the IPOS ECPP Committee is to heighten awareness of and advocate for issues of particular importance to early career professionals, with special attention to the varied challenges that international ECPPs may face.

Chair: Michelle Peate
Discussant: Barry Bultz

S9-1: “How can we support you, let us count the ways”: The Challenges Faced and Resources Available to ECPPs in Limited-resource Countries, M. Chittem

S9-2: Surviving the Early Years in Psycho-Oncology: Fakin’ It ‘Til You Make It, W. Lichtenthal

S9-3: Securing Funding for Your Research, J. Rowland   

Thursday July 30, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 9/10
 
Friday, July 31
 

10:40am

I: Cancer Screening and Navigation
I-1: The Impact of Gender and Race on Diagnosing Colon Cancer during a Primary Care Visit, M.Thomson

I-2: Patient Navigator Competencies: Differences in Role Perception across Health Professions, M. Pratt-Chapman

I-3: Utilization of Screening Services for Breast and Cervical Cancers among Non-Academic Female Staff of Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria, J. Terwase

I-4: Patient Navigation: Scope of Practice as Members of the Oncology Multidisciplinary Care Team, E. Rohan

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:40am

J: Depression and Anxiety
J-1: Use of Prescription Medications for treating Anxiety and Depression among Self-Identified Cancer Survivors in the National Health Interview Survey 2010-2013, N. Hawkins

J-2: A Randomised Trial of a Psychosocial Intervention for Depressed Cancer Patients Integrated into Routine Care, J. Turner

J-3: Relations between Depression and Healthcare use in Patients Diagnosed with Cancer, B. Mausbach

J-4: Modality of Exercise Influences Rate of Decrease in Depression for Cancer Survivors with Elevated Depressive Symptomatology, G. Levin  

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:40am

K: Fertility Preservation and Reproductive Health
K-1: When Ethical Dilemmas Split Teams: Case Studies of Fertility Preservation In the Context of Metastatic Cancer, F. Meyer

K-2: Individual and Workplace Changes: Results of a Nurse Reproductive Health Training Program Follow-Up Survey, I. Sehvoic

K-3: Impact of the ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare) Web- Based Training Program, M. Bowman

K-4:  Young Adult Female Cancer Survivors’ Pre-treatment Fertility-related Experiences Relate to Decision Regret about Fertility Preservation in Post-treatment Survivorship, C. Benedict

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:40am

L: Screening for Distress and Unmet Needs #1
L-1: Translating Distress Screening into Cancer Care: An Implementation Case Study at Gold Coast University Hospital, Australia, M. Hyde

L-2: Is there a Case for Psycho-oncology in India? Establishing the Proof of Concept, B. Sitaram

L-3: Multicultural Validation of the Pediatric Parenting Stress Inventory (PPSI) in Childhood Cancer, M. Dolgin

L-4: The Distress Screening Program Lowers Distress, Depression, and Anxiety in Brazilian Oncology Patients During Primary Treatment, C. Bergerot

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 15

10:40am

S10: The Development of Childhood Cancer Psychosocial Clinical Care Standards
In 2012 The Mattie Miracle Cancer Foundation (MMCF) held a Congressional Symposium on Capitol Hill that addressed the current state of pediatric psycho-oncology. Legislators and their staff members cited the lack of established standards is an impediment to initiating legislation to make psychosocial care an essential component of the medical care of children with cancer in U.S. cancer centers.

Since then, MMCF, working with a group of pediatric oncology psychosocial experts have collaborated to develop a comprehensive set of standards for the psychosocial care of children with cancer based on available evidence and, when that is insufficient, on professional consensus. Two in-person meetings were held in 2013 and 2014 and five working groups were established which have included over 40 multidisciplinary experts and patient advocates. Working groups also met regularly by teleconference to examine and synthesize the professional literature and related professional mandates, in order to create and provide evidence for psychosocial standards and to identify areas where more research is needed.

In this symposium, the MMCF Founders (Peter and Vicki Sardi-Brown) will present history behind the project, provide a summary of the current status of the project, and discuss hopes for implementation. The project leaders (Drs. Lori Wiener, Anne Kazak, Andrea Farkas Patenaude, Robert Noll and Mary Jo Kupst) will describe the process used to develop the currently recommended standards for the psychosocial care of children with cancer, including how the literature reviews were conducted, consensus calls, and the appraisal of the existing supporting literature. Each of the standards will be presented along with a summary of the evidence found. Implementation strategies and approaches to address barriers to implementation will also be reviewed. Key domains where there is insufficient evidence and future research needed will be discussed.

The timing for creating standards is critical. In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer (CoC) will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation. The American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) recently announced recommendations to support a new criterion for cancer center accreditation. APOS, IPOS, along with the Association of Oncology Social Workers (AOSW) and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) endorse the new Commission on Cancer standard of psychosocial distress screening. With these new requirements, cancer clinics are seeking guidance on the development of psychosocial care programs; the proposed standards developed under the auspices of the Mattie Miracle Foundation and professional experts are ideally focused to meet this need.

Chair: Lori Wiener
Discussant: Paul Jacobsen 

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:40am

S11: What Do We Know About Suicide After Cancer?: Understanding the Challenges Across the Treatment Trajectory
Suicidal thoughts and impulses are among the most challenging psychological symptoms in cancer patients.  Though research has shown for decades that a cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for suicide, the problem is not widely addressed and medical professionals working with cancer patients often feel unprepared to understand and respond to suicidal symptoms in their patients.  Appropriately managing suicidal symptoms can be very demanding, often requiring a risk assessment, urgent or emergent mental health care, while also raising concerns about medical symptom management, professional ethics, patient autonomy, and legal liability.  Moreover, much suicide research and interventions to prevent suicide have been conducted with individuals with psychiatric rather than medical conditions, making it difficult to know how well this literature fits with oncology settings or patients.

To improve understanding of suicidal symptoms in cancer patients, this symposium presents three speakers addressing the challenge of suicidal symptoms across the continuum of care from diagnosis and treatment to long-term survivorship and end-of-life care. Andrew Roth (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA), author of several studies on empirically based treatment for depression in cancer patients, will present his recent work on managing risk for suicide in cancer paitents.  Christopher Recklitis (Harvard Medical School, USA) whose work focuses on behavioral outcomes in cancer survivors, will present on the persistence of suicide risk into the survivorship period and the relationship of suicidal symptoms to medical late-effects.  Keith Wilson (Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada), an expert on behavioral health intervention in palliative care, will present on the different ways patients’ may experience a desire for death, including the wish for physician-hastened death.  Each presentation will highlight the challenges in conceptualizing, assessing, and managing suicidal symptoms that are relevant to each phase of cancer treatment.  The symposium discussant, Donald Rosenstein (University of North Carolina Medical School, USA) an expert in psychosomatic medicine and consult-liaison psychiatry, will provide critical commentary on the presentations, putting the findings in the larger context of what is known about suicide in psychiatric and medically ill-populations.  Finally, Dr. Rosenstein will facilitate a question and answer session allowing attendees to comment on the presentations or ask their own questions of the speakers.  Although cancer patients are at increased risk, suicide remains an understudies topic in cancer care; this symposium will inform attendees of the most recent empirical findings on suicidal symptoms in cancer patients and provide information directly relevant to their psycho-oncology research and practice.

Chair: Christopher Recklitis
Discussant: Donald Rosenstein

S11-1: Surviving Cancer but Succumbing to Suicide: What Explains the Risk in Long-Term Survivors?, C. Recklitis

S11-2: Desire for Death, Suicidal Ideation, and Interest in Physician-assisted Suicide in Palliative Cancer Care, K. Wilson

*Evaluating and Managing Risk for Suicide in Patients Receiving Cancer Therapy, A. Roth


*Abstract added after the printing of the abstract book and program 

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:40am

S12: Health Related Quality of Life and Survivorship: A Tri-Country Examination of Chinese Breast Cancer Survivors in Hong Kong, Los Angeles and Sydney
Global migration has led to growing ethnic and cultural diversity in developed countries. Chinese immigrants are the largest Asian immigrant group in Australia and the US. Despite lower breast cancer (BC) rates in their country of origin, BC incidence among Chinese migrants is similar to those in the general population of their naturalized or adopted home. Additionally, among Chinese migrants BC is the most common cancer accounting for the greatest number of cancer deaths. Chinese migrant breast cancer survivors (BCS) have documented poorer cancer outcomes. We explored patient reported HRQOL and survivorship outcomes in a Tri-Country examination of Chinese BCS in Los Angeles (N=73), Sydney (N=130 Chinese and 185 Anglo-Australians) and Hong Kong (N=371).

Chair: Kimlin Ashing
Discussant: Richard Fielding

S12-1: A Prospective Study of Health-Related Quality of Life among Chinese-American Breast Cancer Survivors, K. Ashing

S12-2: Having Cancer in a Country Not Your Own: The Chinese Immigrant Story in Australia, P. Butow

S12-3: Cancer Survivorship: Chinese Women in Hong Kong, W. Lam




Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:40am

S13: Elevating the Patient Voice: Innovative Strategies for Improving Patient-centered Care Through Qualitative and Quantitative Systems of Reporting Patient Experiences
The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2001) identified the delivery of patient-centered care (PCC) essential in improving overall care in the United States. Today, patient-centered care is even more relevant in light of advances in personalized medicine.  Yet, in order to deliver personalized medicine it is critical that we develop methods and tools that accurately and meaningfully capture the patient experience. The purpose of this symposium is to highlight research initiatives designed to more accurately capture patient experience. The symposium will feature three research initiatives: 1) a patient-centered approach for understanding patient appraisals of quality of life (QOL) and how this approach will be used to develop more focused, concise QOL tools; 2) an international initiative for the systematic analysis of patient narratives;  and 3) a community-initiated approach to patient engagement through the Cancer Experience Registry as a tool to capture patient voice during the course of treatment and its implications for informing new research, policy and clinical care. These research initiatives will be discussed with respect to the challenges and opportunities for integrating data across systems and through diverse strategies of patient engagement to enhance care and accelerate discovery.

Chair: Joanne Buzaglo
Discussant: Kevin Stein

S13-1: Understanding Patient Experiences to Inform Treatment Decision-making: Implications for the use of a Patient-powered Registry, J. Buzaglo

S13-2: A Database of Patient Experience: Moving Beyond Anecdote, N. Pandhi

S13-3: Including the Patient's Perspectives in Patient-reported Outcomes: Assessment of Quality of Life Appraisal in Bladder Cancer, B. Rapkin

Friday July 31, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:50pm

M: Cancer Survivorship
M-1: Employment Transitions Among Cancer Survivors: A Longitudinal Qualitative Exploration of the Meaning and Performance of Work Following Cancer Treatment, E. Grunfeld

M-2: Work Functioning in Cancer Patients: The Role of Social Support at Home and at Work, U. Bültmann

M-3: Changes in Working Status and Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Cohort Study, E. Choi

M-4:  Lost in Transition: Impact of Living Environment on Surveillance Behaviors and Psychological Health During Survivorship, D. Kang

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

3:50pm

N: Distress and Quality of Life
N-1: Exploring the Individual Patterns of Spiritual Well-being in Relation to Quality of Life Outcomes in People Newly Diagnosed with Advanced Cancer: A Cluster Analysis, M. Bai

N-2: Psychological Distress and Locally-Advanced Prostate Cancer, L. Zajdleiwcz

N-3: The Art of Adjustment: Assessment of Personal Goals after Cancer Diagnosis, A. Ranchor

N-4: Analysis of Pain Characteristics and Prognostic Factors for Pain Management in 152 Lung Cancer Patients with Moderate or Severe Chronic Pain, W. Nanya

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:50pm

O: Psychosocial and Other Interventions
O-1: Evaluations of Written Self-administered Psychosocial Interventions to Improve Psychosocial and Physical Outcomes Among Adults with Chronic Health Conditions: A Aeta-analysis, S. Lambert

O-2: One-year Follow-up of the Outcome of a Home-based Symptom Management Program for Patients Receiving Adjuvant Cancer Therapy, K. Cheng

O-3: Delivering the Cancer and Aging: Reflections for Elders (CARE) Psychosocial Intervention Through Expressive Writing: A Pilot Study, C.Nelson

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 14

3:50pm

P: Screening for Distress and Unmet Needs #2
P-2: Successful Development and Implementation of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center Comprehensive Wellbeing Screening Program, V. Cardenas

P-3: Use of the NCCN Distress Thermometer and Emotional Problem List in Predicting Psychiatric Symptoms, R. Lynn

P-4: Screening for Distress and Services Needs in Patients Beginning Radiation Therapy, D. Wolcott 

*P-1 has been withdrawn from the program 

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:50pm

S14: The Costs of Caring: Grief in the Oncology Context
Patients’ deaths often have profound and lasting impact, deeply affecting not only their loved ones, but also their healthcare providers.  There is a compelling need to better understand how we can best support those impacted by loss in cancer settings.  This symposium will feature four international speakers whose research focuses on grief and loss. The first presentation will describe findings from a survey of palliative care services in 25 countries conducted by the European Association for Palliative Care Bereavement Task Force that examined the types of bereavement care offered.  The second presentation will describe a model of hospital-based transitional support to assist bereaved families of pediatric cancer patients. The final presentation will focus on the impact of patient loss on providers, focusing on a mixed methods study of the grief experienced by pediatric oncologists.  The symposium will conclude with a discussion about the implications of these studies for advancing bereavement research and for care of our patients, our colleagues, and ourselves.

Chair: Wendy Lichtenthal
Discussant: David Kissane

S14-1: Bereavement Services in European Palliative Care: A Descriptive Study by the Bereavement Taskforce of the European Association for Palliative Care, M. Guldin

S14-2: Transitional Social Support: A Developing Framework for Hospital-based Bereavement Care Following the Death of a Child from Cancer, L. Donovan

S14-4: Delivering Bereavement Support Using Telemental Health: Preliminary Findings from an Open Trial of  Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy Delivered through Videoconferencing, W. Lichtenthal 

Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:50pm

S15: Shades of Survivorship: Opportunities and Challenges in the Rapidly Increasingly Diverse Oncology Population
Minority groups in the US can be classified into four major ethnic groups American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian Americans, African Americans and Latino-Americans.  U.S. minority groups approaches 40% of the overall population, and about 25% of the cancer survivor population. U.S. minority groups are among the fastest growing segments of the general population and among those affected by cancer. Their rapidly increasing representation warrants further research investigating and addressing health related quality of life and survivorship outcomes.  

Chair: Kimlin Ashing
Discussant: Marjorie Kagawa-Singer

S15-1: The Integrated Cancer Care Access Network (ICCAN) Addressing Social and Economic Barriers to Receipt of Optimal Cancer Care Among Underserved Immigrant and Other Minorities in New York City, F. Gany

S15-2: Developing a Clinically, Linguistically and Culturally Relevant Survivorship Care Plan, K. Ashing

S15-3: Ethnic Variations in Physical Symptoms Explained by Different Follow-up Care Communication and Socioeconomic Wellbeing Between Chinese and Caucasian Breast Cancer Survivors, J. Wang

S15-4: Where is the Science of Culture in Cross-Cultural Cancer Survivorship? Native American Cancer Education for Survivors: Using Technology for Greater Reach and Benefit, L. Burhansstipanov

S15-5: Where is the Science of Culture in Cross-cultural Cancer Survivorship, M. Kagawa-Singer



Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:50pm

S16: Disseminating Evidence-based Cancer Supportive Care Interventions: A National and International Imperative
Despite the emergence of clinical guidelines and quality care standards for psychosocial oncology in some parts of the world, the development and implementation of evidence-based interventions to further this field has proven to be a major global challenge. Leading psychosocial experts have developed internationally recognized training programs to overcome key barriers in disseminating evidence-based treatment strategies and in building programs to deliver high quality supportive care to people affected by cancer. This symposia is designed to educate a multidisciplinary global audience about systematic methods for translating evidence into clinical behaviors that enhance performance outcomes of oncology healthcare professionals. Data from three unique federally funded training programs will be described. The first presentation will review findings from a practical skills-based professional education program designed to teach healthcare professionals how to build, implement, and evaluate supportive care programs. The second presentation will discuss implementation of a comprehensive biopsychosocial screening program, and will include the perspective from a trainee who will identify how the program has influenced cancer care within Brazil. The final presentation will review findings from Cancer2Health, a training program designed to disseminate an empirically-supported biobehavioral intervention for helping newly diagnosed patients cope with cancer stress.

Chair/Discussant: Michelle C Fingeret

S16-1: Dissemination and Implementation (DI) of a Biobehavioral Intervention, B. Andersen

S16-2: Disseminating Methods for Implementing Comprehensive Biopsychosocial Screening: A National and International Perspective, K. Clark

S16-3: From Theory to Practice: Disseminating What We Know to What We Actually Do, M. Loscalzo


Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:50pm

S17: APA Division 54 Hematology/Oncology/BMT SIG: Models of Care in Pediatric Psycho-Oncology
This symposium represents collaboration amongst the Hematology/Oncology/Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Special Interest Group of the Society of Pediatric Psychology, American Psychological Association. Currently, there are no best practice guidelines for the provision of psychosocial care for pediatric cancer patients and their families. Therefore, the objective is to describe psychosocial service models across five institutions of varying sizes, resources, and geographical diversity to aid in our understanding of current practices.

Chair: Jennifer Hoag
Discussant: Kristin Bingen

S17-1: The Psychosocial Services Program of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Cancer Center: Translating Research into Practice, L. Barakat

S17-2: Pediatric Psychosocial Care in Oncology, A. Steele

S17-3: Promoting Positive Adjustment for Sibling Donors of Bone Marrow: A Psychosocial Model of Care at a Single Institution, N. Gupta

S17-4: Model of Care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital (NCH), S. Flowers

S17-5: Standard of Psychosocial Care for Pediatric BMT/HSCT Admissions, K. Kullgren 


Friday July 31, 2015 3:50pm - 5:20pm
Marquis Salon 7/8
 
Saturday, August 1
 

10:30am

Q: Adolescents and Young Adults
Q-1: Upbringing, Adult Attachment, and Romantic Relationships in Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors and Healthy Controls, V. Lehmann

Q-2: Improving the Quality of Psychosocial Care for Young Adults in Medical Oncology, P. Souza

Q-3: Long-term Adolescent and Young adult Lymphoma Survivors Score Clinically Relevant Lower on Social, Role and Cognitive Quality of Life Domains Later in Life, O. Husson

Q-4: Autobiographical Disruption and Mechanisms of Distress Among Young Adults with Cancer: Implications for Tailoring Evidence-Based Support, U. Sansom-Daly
 

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

10:30am

R: Communication/Information Needs
R-1: Cancer Disclosure in Romania: Trends and Risks - Translation "From Power to Person" , C. Dégi

R-2:  Providers’ Roles for Advancing End of Life Care Discussions: An Emphasis on Support Staff, F. Nedjat-Haiem

R-3: Health Information Needs of Chinese Patients Diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer: A Longitudinal Study, W. Lam

R-4: The Information Need Discordance Between Cancer Patients and Caregivers in China, T-Yi  

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

10:30am

S18: Coping with Aging and Cancer: Psychosocial Factors and Geriatric-specific Interventions
The “silver tsunami” is the new term for the looming crisis in cancer care related to the increase in elders worldwide—in whom cancer has its highest incidence and for whom there are often fewest psychosocial resources. This symposium addresses age-specific psychological issues related to coping with cancer at an older age by Dr. Greenstein. The impact of social  and religious beliefs on cancer  care of elders will be discussed by Dr. Baider with attention to the customs in the Muslim culture.  Two geriatric-specific psychosocial interventions developed by the Memorial team will be presented by Dr Holland: The CARE  (Cancer and Aging: Reflections of Elders) Model, deliverable by phone, and a novel reading group, the Vintage Readers Book Club, in which elders read and discuss excerpts from the world's classical literature. Discussants are Dr. Chambers, Australia and Dr. Asuzu, Nigeria.

Chair: Jimmie Holland
Discussant: Suzanne Chambers and Chioma Asuzu

S18-1:  Psychosocial Similarities Between Coping with Cancer and Aging, M.Greenstein

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

10:30am

S19: Opportunities and Challenges of Promoting Tobacco Cessation among Cancer Patients: Expanding the Toolkit of the Psycho-Oncologist
Smoking remains the leading cause of cancer associated with at least twelve different cancer diagnoses. Continued smoking is associated with numerous adverse clinical outcomes for cancer patients and survivors including increased risk for treatment complications, disease recurrence, second primary cancers, other tobacco-related chronic medical conditions, poor quality of life, psychosocial distress and death. Tobacco dependent cancer patients are more likely to suffer from comorbid depression, anxiety, insomnia, poor pain control and social stigma. Fortunately, evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological treatment exists; however, adequate training of psycho-oncologists and integration of tobacco treatment in routine cancer care remains subpar. Historically, psycho-oncologists have paid little attention to the clinical problem of continued tobacco use. The proposed research-to-practice symposium will provide a compelling clinical rationale for expanding the role of psycho-oncologists into the treatment of tobacco dependence among cancer patients, summarize tools for standardized assessment of tobacco use, identify the prevalence, patterns and predictors of continued smoking, dispel myths about smoking as an effective form of coping for cancer patients, summarize behavioral counseling techniques for motivating and maintaining smoking cessation, reducing the stigma of reporting smoking and seeking tobacco treatment, discuss patient, provider and systems level barriers and provide practical models for integration of smoking cessation treatment into routine cancer care. Based on their collective scientist-clinician expertise, the presenters will provide a blueprint for developing tobacco treatment services, providing consultation and liaison to medical care providers who treat tobacco dependent cancer patients and delivering evidence-based tobacco treatment in an empathic, supportive and non-judgmental manner.

Chair: Jamie Ostroff
Discussant: Stephanie Land

S19-1: Incorporating Evidence-based Smoking Cessation into Community Oncology Practices: Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an Enhanced Quitline-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention for Cancer Survivors, K. Weaver

S19-2: Smoking Relapse Prevention Intervention for Cancer Patients, V. Simmons

S19-3: Integrating Tobacco Treatment into Cancer Care: Details of Implementation, E. Park   

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

10:30am

S20: The Unspoken Need: Developing Standards and Guidelines for Training Supervisors in Psycho-oncology
Supervision in psycho-oncology is a complex endeavor as supervisees need training in flexibility, patience, critical thinking, consultation, relationship-building, and communication with interprofessional teams, as well as ample room to explore their emotional reactions to working with cancer patients. Given such challenging and specific requirements, this symposium aims to clarify how we may best train supervisors within the field of psycho-oncology. It will be composed of three related discussions with a concluding case study to illuminate key issues. An overview of the limited international literature and results from an online survey will be incorporated into the presentations.

The first part of this symposium will focus on the unique features of supervising in psycho-oncology. There has been a recent call for psychology trainees to learn more about the biological factors in behavioral health and to put the “bio” back in the biopsychosocial model (Larkin, 2014).  Thus supervisees need to learn about the types of medical treatment that their patients receive, and to understand the roles of other professionals, and basic medical terminology.  Furthermore, supervisees require specific skill-training such as differentiating the effects of medical treatment from the symptoms of mood disorders, addressing existential concerns, working with family systems and on recognizing common countertransference responses.

The second part will focus on the training needs and basic competencies of supervisors. Topics include how to educate supervisees on working with an interdisciplinary team, conveying adequate medical information without being overwhelming, maintaining attention to supervisee’s emotional response to the work, how to facilitate supervisee’s awareness of how they as a therapist may avoid certain issues with a cancer patient (e.g. fear of recurrence) and how they may be more active than reflective in the face of illness.

The third part will discuss the recent shifts in the United States in the last decade to conceptualize clinical supervision as a professional competency for therapists.  The implications of the American Psychological Association Guidelines for Clinical Supervision in Health Service Psychology will be discussed with an emphasis on its metatheoretical approach of competency-based supervision and seven domains of supervision. The discussion will focus on how competency-based supervision is relevant to training students in psycho-oncology, and how it will likely influence the development of standards for training supervisors.

We will close the symposium with a supervision clinical case study focused on integrating the three different supervisor roles of counseling, consulting, and educating in a bone marrow transplant setting.

Chair: Mark Moore
Discussant: Nicole Taylor

S20-1: A Lack of Training for the Supervisor: Supervisee-focused Supervision in Psychosocial Oncology, N. Taylor

S20-2: Wearing the Tri-cornered Hat: A Supervision Case Study, N. Taylor

S20-3: Setting Goals in Supervision: Clarifying What Psycho-oncology Supervisees Need to Know and Experience, M. Moore

S20-4: Perceived Importance of Psycho-Oncology Clinical Guidelines for Chinese Cancer Patients and Health Professionals, L. Tang

S20-5: Competency-based Clinical Supervision: New Developments in the United States, A. Kracen
  

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

10:30am

S: End of Life Care
S-1: Searching the Globe: End of Life Beliefs and Practices among Indigenous Women in Northeast India, I. Carrion

S-2: Good Death in Cancer Care in China: A Qualitative Study, L. Song

S-4: Managing the Bureaucracy of Dying: A Qualitative Study of Lay Caregivers as Care Coordinators for Cancer Patients Dying in the Home, S. Mohammed 

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

10:30am

T: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation #1
T-1: Social Support Improves Sleep Quality Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, S. Viozat

T-2: Cancer and Treatment Distress Measurement over Time in a Multicenter Cohort of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT) Recipients (BMT CTN 0902), K. Syrjala

T-3: Psychological and Physical Functioning in Caregivers Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Z. Luo

T-4: One Year After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Study of Couples' Experiences, D. Petricone-Westwood

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 14

10:30am

U: Psychosocial Interventions for Women with Breast Cancer #1
U-1: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management in Breast Cancer: Survival and Recurrence at 11-year Follow-up, J. Stagl

U-2: Does a Peer-Led Exercise Intervention Affect Sedentary Behavior Among Breast Cancer Survivors?, B. Pinto

U-3: A Pilot Study of Subjective Cognitive Functioning Following the Mobile Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Breast Cancer(mMBSR(BC)) Survivors Program, C. Lengacher

U-4:  Are There Patients who Benefit Less From A Self-administered Cognitive-behavioral Therapy  for Cancer-related Insomnia?, J. Savard

Saturday August 1, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:45pm

AA: Quality of Life and Well-Being
AA-1: Examination of Construct Validity of the Brief Resilience Scale in a Mixed Cancer Group, B. Dixon

AA-2: Symptom Burden and Unmet Needs Mediators of Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis, K. Cheng

AA-3: The Mediating Role of Self-Compassion in the Relationship Between Adult Attachment Styles & Psychological Distress Among Oncology Patients, L.Kinsella

AA-4: Positive and Negative Life Changes and Psychological Distress in Survivors of Testicular Cancer, S. Vehling 

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 15

3:45pm

S21: Online Psychological Therapeutic Interventions for People Affected by Cancer
Access to appropriate psychological therapy can be problematic for individuals diagnosed with cancer and their partners, due to a range of barriers including lack of availability, distance, illness, cost and stigma1-3.  In response to these challenges and the recognised need to increase cancer patients’ and partners’ access to psychosocial care, recent psycho-oncology therapeutic interventions have aimed to emulate other areas of health care3, 4 by providing online therapeutic programs as an alternative or adjunct to conventional therapist-administered face-to-face psychosocial interventions.  This symposium aims to present an updated picture of emerging research examining the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of delivering online psychological interventions to individuals diagnosed with cancer and their partners.  Presentations will explore difficulties and benefits of delivering such interventions by reporting on five separate online psychological interventions aimed at different patient groups. 

Chair: Lisa Beatty
Discussant: Haryana Dhillon

S21-1: Finding My Way: Uptake and Satisfaction with an Internet Self-help Program for Cancer-related Distress, L. Beatty

S21-2: The Impact of an Online Psychological Support Program for Men with Prostate Cancer on Sexual Satisfaction: RCT Results from My Road Ahead, A. Wootten

S21-3: Feasibility and Pilot Testing of an Online Psychological Support Intervention for Partners of Men with Prostate Cancer, A. Wootten

S21-4: Improving Reach and Uptake of Psychosexual Support: Introducing Rekindle, a Web-based Psychosexual Resource for All Cancer Survivors and Their Partners, C. Lawsin

S21-5: e-TC: Development and Pilot Testing of an Online Psychosocial Intervention to Reduce Anxiety and Depression in Testicular Cancer Survivors, A. Smith

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Liberty Ballroom Meeting Level 4

3:45pm

S22: Global Psychosocial Standards of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with Cancer: A Review of the Current State of Research and Clinical Care
Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer face significant suffering including anxiety, reduced quality of life, pain and other psychosocial symptoms. Untreated distress and pain in AYAs with cancer predicts long-term psychological late effects, regardless of the outcome of the disease. AYAs with cancer have been understudied and underrepresented in clinical trials. This population faces many short- and long-term health and psychosocial consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment, but many programs for cancer treatment, survivorship care, and psychosocial support do not focus on the specific needs of AYA cancer patients. There is also growing evidence of interventions that can enhance resilience and positive psychological outcomes in AYAs.  During this symposium, leading international AYA experts will present the state of the science in AYA psychosocial care and discuss implications for the clinical setting. 

Chair: Barbara Jones
Discussant: Karen Fasciano

S22-1: Supportive Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer, B. Zebrack 

S22-2: Building Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Theoretical and Patient-Reported Rationale for Positive Psychological Interventions, A. Rosenberg 

S22-3: Assessing and Managing the Distress and Psychosocial Needs of AYA Cancer Patients, P. Patterson

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 1/2

3:45pm

V: Pediatric Cancer
V-1: Attentional Bias Towards Cancer-related Stimuli is Related to Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress in Parents of Children Recently Diagnosed with Cancer, M. Cernvall

V-2: The Effects of Cancer-Related Stress and Perceived Prognosis on Mother-Child Communication about Cancer, M. Keim

V-3: Evaluation of an Electronic Psychosocial Dashboard to Facilitate the Delivery of the Psychosocial Standards of Care in Pediatric Oncology, A. Pai

V-4:  Advances in Pediatric Oncology: A Five-year Nation-wide Survival Follow-up at Children’s Cancer Hospital in Egypt, H.El Malla

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 3/4

3:45pm

W: Adult Cancer Survivors
W-1: Fear of Cancer Recurrence, Quality of Life and Distress in the First Year After the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer, J. Custers

W-2: Trajectories of Quality of Life, Health and Personal Wellbeing in the First Two Years Following Curative Intent Colorectal Cancer: Results from the UK ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) Study, C. Foster

W-3: Autonomy Support and Changes in Self-determined Motivation for Physical Activity Predict Changes in Posttraumatic Growth Among Post-treatment Breast Cancer Survivors, M. McDonough

W-4: Prevalence and Correlates of Physical Activity in Post-Treatment Cancer Survivors, A. Troeschel   

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 7/8

3:45pm

X: Care Delivery and Professional Issues
X-1: Dissemination and Therapists’ Implementation of an Evidence-Based Treatment for Cancer Patients, M. Ryba

X-2: Development of a Resiliency Program for Interpreters in Cancer Care, E. Park

**X-3: LGBTQI Cancer Healthcare Experiences: Results of a Survey of Healthcare Providers and an LGBTQI Population in Florida, G. Quinn 

X-4: Distress in Cancer Survivors Attending a Multidisciplinary Survivorship Clinic, T. Sanft


** X-3 (G.Quinn) will be presented first in this this sesion 

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 9/10

3:45pm

Y: Psychosocial Interventions for Women with Breast Cancer #2
Y-1: The Relationship Between Stress Hormones (cortisol), Cytokines (IL-6) and Symptoms among Breast Cancer Survivors(BCS) in an MBSR(BC) Randomized Controlled Trial(RCT),
C. Lengacher 

Y-2:  A Symptom Cluster Trial, the Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR(BC) on Symptom Clusters among Breast Cancer Survivors(BCS), C. Lengacher 

Y-3: Feasibility and Effects of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT) on Psychological Well-Being in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized, Wait List Controlled Pilot Study, K. Weihs

Y-4:  Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Post-Treatment Survivors with Cancer-Related Cognitive Impairment: Results of a Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial, S. Johns

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 12/13

3:45pm

Z: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation #2
Z-1: Stem Cell Transplant Cancer Survivors’ Associations of Personal Resilience Resources with Longitudinal Changes in Distress and Purpose in Life, R. Campo

Z-2: Developing a Risk Prediction Model for Long-term Physical and Psychological Functioning after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, A. Braamse

Z-3: Pre-transplant Health-related Qality of Life Factors as Predictors of Outcomes Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Study from the BMT CTN 0902 Trial, J. Knight

Z-4: Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression Among Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients, A. Nelson

Saturday August 1, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Marquis Salon 14